White Mischief

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Member Reviews

A thoughtful and thought-provoking exploration of all aspects of cocaine and its historical, cultural, recreational and economic significance. Madge examines all these issues and opens up the conversation about whether we need to rethink our attitudes towards the drug. It’s a comprehensive, balanced and accessible account. Madge contrasts and compares cocaine with other drugs and discusses its legal position. It’s very easy for non-drug users to simply assume that cocaine is “bad” but in this book we are encouraged to be less judgemental. A book like this should be controversial, and indeed it is, but we need informed debate and I felt at the end that I had gained much knowledge and a less prejudiced, and perhaps simplistic, view of what is a complex subject.
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A rather interesting look in the history of cocaine. I do have to admit this had quit a bit of information that I didn't know about before. It's a rather timely book to read due to the current opioid crisis.
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Pretty timely what with the Opiod crisis.  I remember when cocaine  was big during the disco era, late 70's early 80's. Then it sort disappeared, only to replaced by crack, then meth, now opiods. It never ends. I think all drugs should be made legal and let the chips fall where they may. The books background history of cocaine was interesting to read about and it's too difficult for anyone who's interested to read. Writing was a bit rough, but readable.
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A short but surprisingly comprehensive cultural history of cocaine, this book was a fascinating read. Ranging from traditional use in South America, to the first extraction of the active alkaloid, to the crack cocaine epidemic that swept America , the book concludes with a look at the possible future of the drug...would decriminalization work? This book is designed to appeal to the layman, while the science behind the drug is described in the appendices at the end of the book, the main body of the book is simply and clearly written. I liked the fact that the author did not look at cocaine in isolation, but rather looked at how it's popularity has waxed and waned throughout history, in comparison with other drugs such as morphine, heroin, LSD and even ecstasy. I felt this gave the book a well rounded feel and added an interesting extra dimension. I was really interested to learn about the social aspects of the history of the drug, and how it's legal classification has changed over time
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