Dear Rosie Hughes

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 30 May 2019

Member Reviews

I couldn’t get into this book and DNF it at 25%. I really wanted to like it but it just didn’t hold my interest. Sorry!
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Thank you Melanie Hudson and Netgalley for a copy of this title.
I love books done in letters as you really get to identify with the characters. Love dit
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Once I got used to the format (letters and emails) I found Dear Rosie Hughes to be an entertaining and worthwhile read.  It's definitely a beautifully told story of the ups and downs of friendship and life. I appreciated that  Melanie Hudson was able to create such complex and layered characters.  I have to say DRH was an emotional rollercoaster for me.  I will definitely look for more from Ms Hudson.
I received my copy through NetGalley under no obligation.
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I have to be honest, I am shocked this book had so many good reviews. I tried so hard to get into this and found myself skimming through to finish it. I don't mind when books are written as letters, but I just couldn't get into the story lines and characters.
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A feel good book, think this would be a great holiday read! I connected with the characters and enjoyed the style if email/letter exchanges
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This is a wonderful story about female friendships and how we need to try very hard to keep them, or to fix them when broken. Well written and enjoyable
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This book was so easy to get into I absolutely devoured it.

In Dear Rosie Hughes we meet Aggie. She rekindles her long lost friendship with Rosie when she learns from Rosie's dad that following the breakdown of her marriage, Rosie enlisted and has now shipped out to war.

They quickly pick up their old friendship where they left off (before a fall out) and start corresponding regularly through letters. This wonderful book takes you on a journey of friendship, love and rediscovery.

The book is written as a series of letters mainly between Rosie and Aggie, although we hear from Rosie's parents and fellow soldier Gethyn.   I thought that it would take me a while to get into this kind of format, but it was the opposite. From the first letter I was absolutely hooked.

Hudson has a wonderful writing style that you feel like you are part of the friendship between Rosie and Aggie. I loved both characters and although their worlds were so very different, they still had so much common ground and history that it didn't matter to them that they were thousands of miles apart. I also adored Gethyn and the gentle nature of Rosie's dad.

Aggie's dating antics and her humour for dealing with her hurt were literally laugh out loud brilliant, which juxtaposed with Rosie's quiet internal battle made a perfect balance.

But be prepared for that ending as oh my. I have to be honest the ending was a little unsatisfying for me. I completely understand why it was done it just didn't sit well with me (I wanted the formulaic ending!).

I cannot recommend this book enough, it is a perfect feel good book and everyone should read it. I can't wait for Hudson's next offering.

A 5 star read for me.

I would like to thank Netgalley and Harper Impulse for a copy of this book in exchange for a review.
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The synopsis hints at the story, a story of friendship that has drifted and has now been reignited. The whole story is told in a series of emails, letters, and messages. They tell the lives of the characters involved.

I picked this book up only meaning to read a few chapters… I read the lot in one go it was that good. The friends are Aggie and Rosie. They reach out to each other across the miles and rekindle a friendship that ended abruptly. They discuss their lives and loves, experiences and settle misunderstandings.

The story as I have said is a series of messages, letters and each is time and date marked, I saw these as unconventional chapter headings. The author has created such a wonderful story that just enveloped me and with such a distinctive style. When I started I wasn’t sure how this would reach me on an emotional level… how wrong was I! It touched my heart in a huge way, and even now as I sit here typing I can feel that lump in my throat and tears at the edges of my eyes and I read the book several days ago. This is a book that is obviously going to stay with me for a long time, it is a very special book.

As the story made its way, I found that Aggie and Rosie still had a strong, if somewhat tentative at the beginning friendship after a 15-year break. It is one of those situations where I felt that even though they had been apart for many years they were able to pick up where they left off. Yes, they had drifted apart, almost like they had hit pause and were just waiting for the moment when they both needed each other and play could be pressed and all would resume again.

This is a story that made me smile, snigger and sob buckets. It ticked so many boxes without me realising it, I was absolutely absorbed and hooked by this beautiful story. It is one that I would highly and abso-flamin-lutely recommend.
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It's the authenticity and warmth of this story that kept me reading. Cleverly constructed as electronic letters and emails between Rosie, stationed in the Middle East, on the eve of the Iraq War in 2003 and Aggie, her estranged childhood friend. The two women, now in their mid-thirties rekindle a friendship that they both need at this pivotal time in their lives.

Mixed in with family letters and letters from friends both past and present, they tell the story of the women's lives, their feelings, and let the reader travel on their journey of self-discovery in two vastly different settings.

This is a poignant story. It's easy to imagine how Rosie feels so far from home and empathise.

The plot is well-paced, original. Every letter reveals another clue to women's past lives and their state of mind. The characters are believable and flawed but you want them to be happy.

The ending is beautifully drawn together with a twist that resonates. One of my favourite stories so far this year and I've already read forty books.
 
I received a copy of this book from Harper Impulse via NetGalley in return for an honest review.
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What an incredible book! When I started it, I had no idea what to expect, other than the fact I had seen people talking about it wherever I turned on social media.  By the end of the book I was completely broken by a book that will stay with me for a very long time.

This book takes the form of a series of letters and emails, sent through the military system, and then eventually via regular email.  Agatha Braithwaite and Rosie Hughes were inseparable friends throughout their childhood, but an incident in early adulthood ended their relationship until Rosie is deployed to Kuwait as a reservist in advance of the war in Iraq in 2003.  When Agatha finds out that Rosie is off to war, she writes to Rosie, and both women are overjoyed to reconnect.  Their correspondence focuses on their current issues, Aggie is plagued by a difficult mother, and writer's block for her ghost-writing career, Rosie is facing a divorce she regrets, whilst worrying about the impending war.  The issues that tore them apart, and the deeper issues both women have are eventually revealed in their letters to one another.  Interspersed between their letters and emails are additional correspondence with Rosie's parents, her soon-to-be ex husband Josh, a troubled boy in their old primary school, and a growing friendship between Aggie, and Rosie's friend in Kuwait, Gethyn, a military doctor.

As the book progresses, Aggie runs away from her issues to help run a cafe in a remote location in Scotland, and her experiences with the new people she meets are shared in her letters to Rosie, with much hilarity.

There were so many funny moments in the book, that I spent far too much of my time giggling out loud, although I did not anticipate that the book would leave me with tears streaming down my face as I tried not to wake my sleeping husband at the side of me!

I know that some people are not fond of books that consist entirely of correspondence, but I found it created the perfect balance, and if anything, it was possible to form stronger opinions of who Rosie and Aggie were as people, based on witnessing their complete openness with one another.  I really did not expect to be so moved by this book, but it is going to be a strong contender for my favourite book of the year.

Many thanks to Melanie Hudson, Harper Impulse and Netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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Wow where do I start, I picked this book up after hearing fab reviews and I literally couldn't put it down.

Rosie Hughes has had a really tough few years and has signed up for a mission to Iraq hoping to find some closure, this story is an exchange of letters to her friends and family during her 6 month posting.

I loved this book from the very first letter, the insight it provided to being a woman on the frontline and the emotional rollercoaster experienced for both Rosie and her family. A story full of love, where Rosie rebuilds relationships and stripped away from the daily grind establishes the direction she wants her life to take.

A beautiful story from start to finish that I highly recommend and left me bereft when I had finished.
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I usually love an epistolary novel, but I just didn’t enjoy this one. I found most of the characters to be irritating, there were several dropped plot threads, and I truly hated the ending.
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Truly beautiful. There are not enough words for how I feel about this book. Funny and poignant in equal measure, I think a certain part of this book actually broke my heart a little. 

I must buy a paperback copy of this book to keep on my bookcase to read again.
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Rosie Hughes and Aggie Brathwaite are childhood friends who for reasons only known to them fell out fifteen years previous to the novel. However, when Rosie volunteers to go to the front line in Iraq as a Meteorologist, Aggie feels the need to get back in touch, mainly to ask what the Hell Rosie is actually playing at! And so it begins. 

Melanie Hudson is extremely clever in the way she has approached this book. Rather than the normal prose that we expect, the whole manuscript is set out as letters and emails between the two female leads but also between Rosie and her parents, a fellow solider, a schoolchild and a soon to be ex-husband. 

I wasn't sure how I would feel about this at first but soon I was loathe to put this down. My morning and evening commute from the day job has seen me so absorbed in this book I almost missed my stop! 

The words flow as do the giggles, the emotions and everything else that goes with it. 

The only reason I gave this book four stars was THAT ending! My poor fragile heart! 

Thank you so much to Harper Collins and NetGally for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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Aggie and Rosie used to be friends but haven't spoken in 15 years (due to a man and a misunderstanding!). When Aggie learns Rosie has been deployed to Kuwait as the Army Met Officer, she knows her best friends needs her now  more than ever, so writes her a letter. Soon the pair begin exchanging their hopes, dreams and everything they have missed through the years. 

I adored the format of this novel entirely written through letters. Hudson's characters are so well-drawn you can't help falling in love them and rooting for them to get their happy endings. The ending is predictable but you become so invested you are hoping and keeping everything-crossed that you are wrong, and Hudson couldn't possibly end it like that, could she?! - I was reading the last few pages with an uneasy feeling of dread in my stomach. This novel is a little gem, heart-warming and heart shattering in equal measure - laughing and crying along with this cast of wonderful characters is not to be missed!  

Thanks to NetGalley, Harper Impulse & Killer Reads for sending me this in exchange for an open and honest review.
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Enjoyed the book. It took place during the Iraq War. It was interesting reading about Rosie and Gethyn in Kuwait and Iraq and how their time was spent. They seemed to be bored most of the time and not have much to do. I never realized meteorologists would be needed during a war. I definitely got to know Aggie and Rosie through their letters, also their family and friends. After all of Aggie's descriptions of the café and Scotland, I want to visit. It seemed so beautiful. i was not surprised by the ending.

Aggie and Rosie were the best of friends, until a man came between them. They haven't spoken in for fifteen years. When Aggie learns that Rosie has been deployed to Kuwait, she writes her a letter. The friends continue to write back and forth and make plans to meet up. Add in some letters/emails from Rosie's family, Aggie's crazy mom, Gethyn and a young school boy.

Loved the characters, story and writing style. I liked getting to know everyone through their emails/letters. Loved finding out who the guy was that caused all the problems between Aggie and Rosie. It was not who I thought it would be. Honestly, he didn't seem like a very nice person. I loved Aggie and her crazy ways. She was full of adventure. Can't believe she flew to Venice for a booty call and definitely wasn't expecting the person who showed up. Loved how Aggie and Rosie helped each other through their letters. This book is all about friendship.

I definitely recommend the book and look forward to reading more by the author. 

Thanks to NetGalley, Harper Impulse and Killer Reads and the author, Melanie Hudson, for a free electronic ARC of this novel.
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I love books written in letter form, I find them so easy to read and get into the character's heads.
I thought that their friendship was lovely, friends from school are precious. 
Such a lovely book and incredibly easy to read.
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Aggie’s friendship with Rosie Hughes was shattered fifteen years ago. However, after hearing that Rosie is stationed in Kuwait as a weather forecaster on the the eve of the Iraq War, Aggie buries the past and writes to her. What follows is their series of correspondences and the comforting words they provide as they navigate their different, unpredictable worlds.

There’s something magical about this second-chance friendship. In the opening letter from Aggie, it’s understood that her relationship with Rosie ended badly, but there isn’t an immediate explanation as to what happened. Aggie appears to have just had a moment of spontaneity, but Author Melanie Hudson expertly drops hints in each subsequent letter, peeling back the layers of the connection between these two women. 

Hudson deserves praise for how she handles this format. Letters and emails can be intensely personal forms of communication, but they also require a bit of familiarity of the subjects in order to achieve full appreciation. However, as Aggie writes about missed deadlines and writer’s block and Rosie responds with the tensions of war, Hudson uses this rekindled friendship to her advantage— she drops backstory and new complications with ease. It reads as chatty, rather than as the stilted ramblings they could. Even more remarkably, Aggie’s complaints of working as a ghost writer hold up against Rosie’s apprehensions of fitting in in a war zone. These sections are of two friends needing to depend on one another for support, whether that’s venting when a rucksack is too heavy or if a cake isn’t spongy enough.

All of this is aided by the addition of correspondences with other characters. Aggie writes to her mother, Rosie writes to her parents, and a charming doctor who works with Rosie, Gethyn, takes up chatting with Aggie. It’s interesting reading as the same information is disseminated to different individuals— not everyone is offered the same perspective, sometimes complicating their interactions. Sometimes it’s funny, sometimes it’s heartbreaking, but it’s always insightful as to what these characters actually believe.

At its core, this is a story of a friendship that feels so real, so true. There’s hope and intense joy, but also devastating pain— everything that comes with loving another person. We should all have what Hudson describes within these pages— a friend that we can turn to, even after fifteen years, and keep on as though time never passed.
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Perfect chick lit!  I loved the premise and the characters were well developed!  I recommend this for anyone looking for a light and fun read!
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Rosie and Aggie used to be best friends but then fell out of touch after something happened before they went to university. Fast forward 15 years and Rosie signs up to go to the Persian Gulf as a meteorologist and Aggie is a ghost author, suffering from a writer's block. The two women start to write to each other and in a series of letters and emails we can see the strength of their friendship, as they explore their dreams, hopes and regrets.

I absolutely adored the way the book was written. The letters were sometimes able to tell us more than a conversation, the characters opened much more on the pages than face to face and it made the reading so captivating and interesting. The two main characters were totally different but it was easy to see why they used to be best friends, and also why they lost touch. Rosie's relationship with her parents was beautiful and I loved their letters to each other, and how they tried to protect the other one. We see Rosie, after all the drama in her life, adapting to her new life in the desert, watching the results of war and the horrors of it. Aggie is the larger than life in this friendship, has brilliant sense of humour and doesn't treat herself too seriously and is not afraid to laugh at herself. Her dating adventures were hilarious. But there was also a hidden depth to her, the other side - the vulnerable one. She was colourful and there was nothing stopping her, while Rosie wanted just to blend in - but it doesn't mean that she wasn't a great character, because she was. Learning about her life, of her losses, of everything that happened to her was heart - breaking. There were of course other lovely characters - Gethyn, Rosie's parents, Aggies's new friends at the cafe - even though they were not completely introduced to us, I still had a feeling that I know them, that they are simply good people. They all added tons of depth and humour to the story.

The letters between the characters were mostly short but they contained all the information that we needed, and the informal way of them made the book so easy to read and - actually - really chatty. You don't always need all the details, I liked that there was room for imagination left to us. The author writes in such a way that you can identify with all the feelings and emotions the characters experience. You feel pain, fear, hope and joy - it is so perfectly captured.

So now. My problem. I loved this book, it was beautiful. Until almost the end. But at the end the author has made a decision that I've simply couldn't agree with - it was a "no" from me. If I were a "normal" reader, and not a reviewer, who also appreciates thousands of other details that made me fell in love with this book, I probably wouldn't give the book the 4 stars - it would be much, much less, simply because I can't agree with the decision. I know it wasn't my decision but still, it crushed me. It left me in pieces. For me, it wasn't necessary. I appreciate it but don't understand it. Now I'm going to shut up. But let me repeat that it was a beautiful, poignant, moving story about love, friendship and family, about new beginnings and second chances. About the value of friendship, about making the most of every day. It was charming and emotional, full of different kinds of feelings and emotions and I adored it. Highly recommended!
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