Letting Go of the Need to Be Right

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 30 May 2019

Member Reviews

I enjoyed reading Jeff Dollar's stories of his life and his experiences.   I LOVE to be right and have the last word.   I like the idea in Jeff's book where he talks about looking at our motives and not to steal the spotlight.   Relationships are important and we often need to look beyond ourselves and our desires to build relationships.   We don't always need to be right, we need to experience the power of humility to help build relationships or mend broken relationships.   Sometimes our motives cause us to stumble and we are not listening because we are already forming a comeback.   We need to slow down and be present.   Jeff's book doesn't really share anything I didn't already know, but I enjoyed his stories and seeing his relationship with God as it grew over time.   A great reminder of the "Power of Humility".   I received this book for an honest review from NetGalley.
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In Letting Go of the Need to be Right, Jeff Dollar shares his personal experience of discovering the need for humility.  This autobiography is marketed as a self-help book, but contains mostly stories about Dollar's personal experience, with a minimal amount of questions for self-reflection at the end of each chapter.

Dollar and I differ drastically in our doctrine, and that became very obvious the further I read in this book.  His charismatic background provided the basis for much of his self-reflection, and that was something to which I could not relate.  While his life story was interesting, this book fell short for me.
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This is a great book for people who value finding religion in their everyday life.  The approach to sharing the insight of his own life and how he could've been more impacted by his religious beliefs was a clear highlight of those who read this book.  There were a lot of points curated that symbolized the scripture that was presented and the author's focus on his own struggles was valid and real.   The stories he shared read more of a memoir than the anticipated self-help book I was expecting,  I'm sure this book will do well within the demographic that it should be marketed for - Christians/Catholics/religious-minded - but for me, there was not enough tangible analysis that could hold my interest.
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I didn’t feel I gained much insight from this book.  It was mainly life stories.  I prefer more instruction in my self-help books and less storytelling.

I received this galley from NetGalley.
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Perhaps, the greatest thing I learned from this book is that it's not always about being right, but rather understanding and I've struggled with this, with always wanting to be right to have the last word, so this right here was an eye opener for me.
Thanks Netgalley for the eARC. It's quite an insightful read for Christians.
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I do like to be right, and I like to hold onto a grudge. I had hoped that this book would help me to deal with both these character traits.

Sadly, I found, the religious element in this book detracted from the main message.

Thank you to NetGalley and to the publisher for allowing me the opportunity to read this.
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An amazingly powerful exercise in self awareness and humility .. Becoming accountable for our own attitude. And fixing ourselves first through Jesus Christ.. 
Highly recommend reading !!
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I received a free e-copy of Letting Go of the Need to Be Right: What's so Wrong With Being Wrong Anyway? by Jeff dollar from NetGalley for my honest review.

First off, I would like to say that don't normally read self help books. I was intrigued by this one because I feel like I am around more people that seem to have this perception of being right all the time and I find it very frustrating. I thought maybe I could learn some things and become more patient. I don't really feel like I learned anything to change my thoughts but parts of the book were interesting while some parts seemed to drag on. I also felt like there were a lot of life stories of Jeff versus what I was hoping and expecting to be a learning to let things go of wanting to be right lesson.

It seems like our culture is a need to be right culture. Why is it so important to be right? Well, I guess if we aren't right, that makes us wrong. Being wrong makes us feel like we are failures and is humiliating. If you find yourself wrong, are you easy to accept it without feeling foolish? Example: When you were in high school or college and you answered a question wrong in front of the whole class. How did you feel?

The need to be right all the time impedes our happiness and our lives, our friendships and relationships. Do you really want to damage a relationship that you care so much about just for the sake of being right? You must decide if you want to be right or you want to be happy.
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Ooops I did not read the blurb properly before requesting this book.  The religious content is just not for me.
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I have to admit that, although I was provided a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review, I was unable to finish it.  I got as far as chapter 11 before I stopped because it simply wasn't the book I thought it would be.

I expected something that would really deal with the issues of arrogance I admittedly tend to face in my own life, which manifest themselves with arguments and self-righteousness.  I suspect the author might have gotten there eventually as there were a few hints in that direction, but that's not how the first 11 chapters played out.

Instead, what the book contained was a biography of his life with lessons he learned along the way while making some very foolish decisions. There is certainly value in those lessons, specifically in seeing yourself as Good sees you, but the lessons just weren't on point for the title of the book and the expectations I had for it.
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I started reading this book and I loved some of the content. When I requested an advanced copy, I didn’t look closely enough to notice that it’s a Christian book. I am not a Christian and so as I was reading it, I struggled with wanting to finish. This is in no way a reflection of the book, but of my own beliefs.  I do always feel the need to be right, so I definitely learned a bit within the first few chapters. As I said, I am not a Christian, so I did not finish the book. I would recommend it to anyone that is a Christian, however.
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