Cover Image: All the Water in the World

All the Water in the World

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Member Reviews

Absolutely loved it, one of my favourites this year.  It had great characters that really came alive for me.  The story was beautiful and sad and left me with feeling bereft when I finished.  I highly recommend this book.
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Thank you Netgalley for the chance to read this book in exchange for an honest review. I am a  fan of books in this genre, so I was very much looking forward to reading this one. I was not dissapointed and both the plot and characters gripped me from the start. I will definitley aim to read another by this author. Highly reccomended!
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I thought this was beautifully written and quite poetic at times. I enjoyed it but at the same time I do not think I would re-read this one.
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Such a sad story, but told with truth and you can't fail to fall in love with Maddie.  She is a 15 year old who is ill with cancer.  The story is told through her and her mother, which allows for great truths and raw honesty.  The story tackles the fear of cancer both from the mother and daughter perspectives.  How it changes you as a parent to have a sick child and how the child grapples with puberty and all its wants and changes while being seriously ill.  Please be warned it is a tear-jerker, I had a little weep:-)
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Beautifully written, some of the descriptions of natural world are poetic and moving. I particularly enjoyed Tate Modern and Falling Water writing.
Evie has to deal and come to terms with her teenage daughter's cancer, she has the support of her parents and partner Robin. 
Maddie has never met her father Antionio, but tracks him down and has a relationship with him by email, never telling him of her cancer diagnosis.
Lots of threads to story, Maddie's talent as an artist, her first boyfriend, the kindness of friends and the painful reality of cancer. Evie's suffering after her daughter's death lead her to confront Antionio  with pent up anger and regret.
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This book takes such a difficult subject and tackles it so well. It is equally beautiful and heartbreaking. Thanks to the publisher for allowing me to read this.
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I cannot imagine the pain and devastation of having a child sick with cancer. This book is remarkable and tackles this devastating subject with tenderness and honesty. Heartbreaking and so wonderfully written.
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I was worried that this book would be too sad to ''enjoy'', but i was wrong. This is a moving and heartbreaking read. We are told the story from both the perspectives of mother and teenage daughter and learn about their relationship with the added heartache of cancer. The characters are realistic and well developed
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All the water in the world is a heartbreaking and poignant read with some powerful messages.

This book explores love, parental relationships and loss while being told from the perspective of mother and child. You can't comprehend what these two characters are going through.

Although an adult book I felt there was a strong YA feel to this. Throughly enjoyed this book and the writing style flowed effortlessly. So tender. 

This book will stay with me for a long time. It will not only break you but fill you with hope.
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A moving, heartbreaking read told from the perspectives of mother and teenage daughter. This book tackles the fragility of mother- teenage daughter relationships with the added heartache of cancer. The characters are authentic and their story telling draws you in. Keep tissues to hand!
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After being scared that this book would be too sad I finally decided to pick it up and boy oh boy it was a roller coaster. Yes it was sad at times but s beautifully told through the voices of Maddy and her mum Eve. This was such a beautiful story and will stay with me. Very impressive for a debut novel! Highly recommend.
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A powerful novel about bereavement and loss, and how families cope with terminal illness.  Sharply drawn characters, alternately telling the story, bring the novel to life and the author has a real talent for getting inside the mind of a teenage girl.  A reflective and engrossing book.
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I expected to feel heartbroken & I was but this wonderful book is so much more than just a story about a young girl with cancer. It is beautifully written with many other facets. I loved it.
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What an absolutely heartbreaking story. It was quite hard to read sometimes but it was well written and a great read
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All the Water in the World by Karen Ramey is a wonderfully written story of a family in crisis. It’s told alternately by Eve and her daughter, Maddy. The emotions described in the course of the story are so evocative; the reader can’t help but be drawn in to the drama. The tragic storyline is sensitively handled and never becomes overly sentimental. I thoroughly recommend it. 

Grateful thanks to Netgalley and the publisher Two Roads for the opportunity to read this novel.
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Thank you to Netgalley and John Murray Press for this advanced reader's copy. Slow burn of a book. While it takes times to build the story, it definitely pulls on a heartstrings. Hard to imagine enjoying a book thats story is build around teen cancer but it's beautiful and engaging.
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Hard to say you enjoyed a book when it's about a teen with cancer but I did!  Maddy is a very sympathetic character and you really feel for her.  It's unimaginable what families in this situation must go through but I think Maddy portrays her feelings very well.
Eve just irritated me to be honest.  I didn't like her and thought she was incredibly selfish.  I'm not sure why Robin wanted to be with her.
Overall, i thought that it was an impressive debut.
My thanks to netgalley, the author and the publisher for this copy.
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This novel tells the story of 16-year-old Maddy, who has cancer, and decides to reach out to the father she has never met before it's too late. It also tells the story from her mother's perspective, offering insight into how she's coping with having a terminally-ill daughter. 

It's certainly a slow burner, and the large focus on the teenager and her friendships and relationships made it feel more like a YA novel. Although it's about a tragic situation, with the potential to pull at the reader's heartstrings, I did not feel drawn to the characters unfortunately and if it weren't for reviewing it, I'm not sure I would have persevered.
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I loved Maddy's sections of this book. She seemed very natural, well written, and I understood her. I couldn't empathise with everything she was going through but I understood her actions and her questions and her decisions.

The book itself I think is well written, I was devastated when then inevitable happened and I thought it was handled beautifully. It was honest, and heartbreaking. I would imagine that is a fine line to tread as an author and Karen Raney trod it perfectly.

I could not comprehend Eve, at least, not afterwards. If she's supposed to be incomprehensible then well done, but it made for hard reading when you can't understand a character's motives. I wonder if Eve didn't understand them herself. Robin's shout of "you're wrong!" finally recalls her to herself, perhaps she had become destructive in her grief. 

While writing this review I changed my grading from 3 to 4 stars because I was thinking more about Eve. I still don't understand her, but maybe I understand why I don't. She's lashing out at a world she no longer understands. I'll be thinking about this book in the future.
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I hadn’t read a synopsis of this novel before starting it and since I was reading it on my Kindle it meant that I came to the structure and story entirely fresh.

The story unfolds gradually, interweaving the narratives of Eve and her teenage daughter Maddie.  I suspect that most people will engage more with one voice than the other, probably depending upon their own stage in life, however both have very touching moments and the inter-generational relationships in particular are handled well and say something interesting.

I don’t want to delve into the specifics of the story too much as I don’t want to add spoilers but I will say that the book covers themes such as teenage illness, teenage relationships, single parent families, art and climate change.

I enjoyed the book and found some sections really moving but I did have a few issues with it which lost it the 5th star.  I’m not sure of the target audience?  This is mainly because of the split narrative. If Maddie’s has been the only voice then it would have clearly been in John Green territory but the adult pov makes that more problematic.  To me, the tone throughout sounded younger than the material.  Finally, everyone is nice and supportive of everyone else. Having experienced considerable periods of illness in my own youth, that sadly didn’t ring true.  There are always some people who surprise you with their kindness - usually those you least expect - but there are also those you are sure will support you, who in the event, run a mile. Having people like that might have added a more nuanced and honest element to the narrative.

Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an ARC in return for an honest review.
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