Cover Image: Orders to Kill

Orders to Kill

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December 1917. Ada Hobbes arrives on a frosty morning to clean the house owned by Dr Tindall, a surgeon at the Edmonton Military Hospital. She is shocked to find the blood-covered body of her employer sprawled across the floor. He has been hacked to death.

Detective Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy arrive to a horrific scene. Someone enjoyed killing him, without a doubt. Their investigation takes them far out of London and on the trail of a very different Dr Tindall, one who was not the respectable local GP everyone thought he was. Marmion and Keedy will need to sift through a number of likely suspects to find the killer behind this gruesome murder.
Ohh the storyline was fascinating, deep, intense, thrilling, and shocking!
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Orders to Kill by Edward Marston
Although I did finish this book I did not really enjoy it immensely. It was a bit boring until about halfway through and the ending was a little ridiculous. The reason for the murders was hard to accept as plausible. The main characters were all male and the female characters were mostly weak and wobbly. 
The only one who was interesting was the detective’s daughter. I might enjoy a book about her. I have not read the previous books in this series but that did not seem to detract from understanding the plot.
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Edward Marston is a genius and his latest addition to his "Home Front Detective Series" is a compelling whodunit set in 1917, a sinister tale where horrific murders, human deceit and really  misplaced religious righteousness violently collide, sending the reader into a wild manhunt across England. A dazzling "tour de force" deftly plotted, elegantly written and blessed with a cast of highly sympathetic characters, this clever murder mystery offers also a vivid tapestry of an English society starting to be overwhelmed by the madness of a long and bloody war. 

A recommended murder mystery that is also a very engrossing & entertaining piece of historical fiction that deserves to be enjoyed without any moderation whatsoever👍👍

Many thanks to Netgalley and Allison & Busby for this terrific ARC.
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Edward Marston involves Detective Inspector Marmion and Sergeant Keedy  in a series of brutal murders that seem to be linked.  The first Dr. Tindall, a highly respected GP, turns out to be a womanizer and multiple bigamist. Later victims also have a besmirched past.  Marmion starts to think someone is orchestrating the killings and the motive lies in the Frontline in France.  Good atmospheric mystery in 1917 Britain.
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Set in the First World War, Detective Marmion and his to-be son in law Keedy are faced with a gruesome murder of a local doctor, much revered by his medical colleagues for his work with wounded soldiers.  However, the doctor's life is not as it first seems, and gradually the pair unearth disturbing facts and reveal that the motive was not so much theft as revenge.

An exciting and thrilling read, set cleverly into the War without allowing that to be the focal point.  I enjoyed it.  

Thanks to Allison and Busby and Netgalley for allowing me access to the ARC for an honest review.
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Orders to Kill is the 9th historical procedural mystery in the Home Front Detective series by Edward Marston. Released 21st Oct 2021 by Alison & Busby, it's 320 pages and is available in hardcover and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. 

This is a well written historical series and this installment sees inspectors Marmion and Keedy investigating the particularly brutal murder of a revered orthopedic surgeon. It's set in London during WWI and the inspectors will travel outside their home precincts to find the guilty and bring them to justice. 

Despite being the 9th in the series, it works well as a standalone and there are no huge spoilers for the earlier books if read out of order.  This is a well written and engaging series, however, the writing is uneven in places and there are a few instances of dialogue which yanked me out of my suspension of disbelief. The end conflict, denouement, and resolution were a trifle two dimensional and flat. There was very little sense of danger. There were also some plot threads which seemed tacked on and could have been trimmed down and streamlined without problem (Alice and Iris' entire interaction and shopping trip, for example).

All in all, though, the author is quite competent and the mystery is a light and engaging one.

Three and a half stars. This would be a good choice for fans of historical British police procedural mysteries. 

Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.
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An enjoyable instalment to this popular series, however I do feel that ongoing storylines, two in particular throughout the books need to come to an end now as they are getting boring in my opinion.
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Edward Marsten's Orders to Kill is an excellent addition to the Home Front Detectives series! The murder of a doctor leads Detective Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy on an interesting trail, with too many suspects and motives. This particular plot is fascinating, leading the reader down several possible trails before bringing it to a surprising conclusion. The characters in this series are so well done and constantly evolving. I look forward to the next book! Thank you to #NetGalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of #OrderstoKill.
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I really enjoyed this book and seeing how the crimes fitted together, and how they solved it, but am baffled as to why the character of Paul was written in as by the ending nothing had really changed with him since the beginning of the book, but a lot of space had been taken up writing about him. There was also lots written about Ellen and Alice due to the Paul story, but yet again it just felt like a waste of time as it took away from the crime solving and wasn't at all interesting. I'd give the crime side 5 stars but think there was too much padding added into the book to make it completely enjoyable
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December 1917 Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy are called out to a brutal killing. That of Dr George Tindall, whos body was discovered by his cleaner Ada Hobbs. But why would any one want to murder such an honourable man. Soon the team discover similar killings.
An entertaining and well-written historical mystery, with its likeable and varied characters. The book can easily be read as a standalone story.
An ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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I read other mysteries by Edward Marston but this is the first I read in this series and I'm sure I will read the others as it was a gripping and highly entertaining read.
Great character development, vivid historical background, a solid mystery that kept me guessing till the end.
I thoroughly enjoyed it and it's strongly recommended.
Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine
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Not what I was expecting at all but an interesting storyline.  I think I will go back to the first book in this series.  Thanks to Netgalley.
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I would like to thank Netgalley and Allison & Busby for an advance copy of Orders to Kill, the ninth novel in the Home Front Detective series, featuring Detective Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy of Scotland Yard.

December 1917. Marmion and Keedy are called to a brutal murder scene. Respected orthopaedic surgeon Dr George Tindall has been tortured and murdered, but why? Further investigation suggests that Dr Tindall had secrets and that he may not be the killer’s only victim.

I thoroughly enjoyed Orders to Kill, which is a good, old fashioned whodunnit with a plot well suited to the era. It is mostly told from the police point of view, so the reader gets to guess alongside the detectives, something I failed at miserably. I had no idea where it was going and had to be led the whole way. I thought that not being able to see the solution in advance was a good thing as it made the novel intriguing and absorbing. I would say that the plot is slightly far fetched, but it suits the historical setting when morals were stricter and the shame was greater. Anyway, who cares? It’s entertaining and held my attention throughout.

The novel doesn’t restrict itself to criminal investigation. Marmion’s family and their problems get a thorough airing as well, notably their son who is suffering from what we now identify as PTSD and has disappeared, renouncing his family. It brings a flavour of the era to the novel. The humour in the novel is provided by Marmion’s interactions with his boss, Superintendent Chatfield. They made me smile.

Orders to Kill is a good read that I have no hesitation in recommending.
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It's always a pleasure to find a new (to me) historical police series, and especially one set during The Great War. I have read most of the Inspector Hardcastle series but, sadly, Graham Ison is no longer with us. RN Morris's Silas Quinn books are great fun too, but most of those I have read recently are re-published editions of books written some years ago. Orders To Kill, by the accomplished and prolific historical novelist Edward Marston, is bang up to date, publishing wise, and it is the ninth in what is called the Home Front Detective series.

Investigating duos are always a reliable way to spin a police novel, and in this case we have Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy of the Metropolitan Police. Marmion is married to Ellen, with a son and daughter. Son Paul has been mentally damaged by his time on the Western Front, and has now disappeared leaving no clue as to his whereabouts, while daughter Alice - also a service police officer - is engaged to Keedy.

It is December 1917 and Marmion and Keedy are investigating the brutal murder of a prominent surgeon, Dr Tindall, who has been working at a military hospital in London. He is found dead in his house, horribly mutilated by - according to the pathologist - a large bladed weapon, perhaps a bayonet. The dead man was highly thought of at his hospital, and widely admired by others who knew him, but when attempts are made to establish a possible motive, serious questions arise. Why, for example, can police find no trace of George Tindall's parents at the Scottish address listed on his file? Why does the current owner of what was named as his Brighton home say that she has never heard of him?

He was clearly a wealthy man, and one who paid cash for his elegant Savile Row suits, but what motive could he possibly have had for fabricating a personal background? As the equanimity of the Marmion household is disrupted by alarming family news from Somerset, the women take a train to Shepton Mallett, while Marmion himself is confronted with fresh discoveries about the George Tindall many thought they knew well.

Edward Marston (real name Keith Miles) keeps us well tuned in to the news from abroad, as the Tindall case plays out against news of General Allenby's triumphant entry into Jerusalem, and how the initial British success at Cambrai was tainted by a fierce German fight back. For Marmion and Keedy however, the Tindall case seems to be spiraling out of control as it seems his killers are two men taking their orders from a higher authority - and Tindall is not their first victim. The detectives travel to Brighton, Kent, Bristol and Staffordshire in their efforts to make the case make sense, but ultimately they must make one last - and infinitely more dangerous journey - before they reach a solution to this most intractable of mysteries.


Orders To Kill is highly readable, written by an author who clearly knows his history and is an accomplished storyteller. Published by Severn House, it will be available on 21st October.
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I truly enjoyed this WWI murder mystery set in 1917's London. This book is 9th in the 'Home Front' series, however, having not read the previous ones, I did not feel like I missed out on anything. I quickly got to grips with the main characters and the plot (there is also a subplot which I will explain later). 

George Tindall, an affluent and well respected doctor working at Edmonton Military Hospital has been brutally murdered. The local community is aghast why such a quiet and private man could meet such horrid fate. His butchered body is found by his cleaner, Ada Hobbs. Two detectives, Inspector Marmion and Sergeant Keedy, are assigned to the case.

They soon find out some facts about the doctor: he was Scottish, widowed, and unusually for a wealthy man he didn't keep any servants. The detectives are puzzled because they have no indication of a motive for this heinous crime. They start to dig deeper into doctor's past, only to find out that George Tindall wasn't as respectable as everyone thought he was. Marmion and Keedy discover Tindall's shocking secret which could potentially be a reason why he was murdered... 

Marmion is a distinguished Scotland Yard detective with years of experience. He reckons that there were two perpetrators. Is he right? Who and why killed George Tindall? You will have to read for yourselves to find out!

The above is the main plot of 'Orders to Kill'. The book also features a subplot, where we get to know other characters in Marmion's life: his wife Ellen, and their headstrong daughter Alice, who is a WPC (women's police constable). Ellen accepted her husband's line of work years ago and is used to his long working hours. She is missing their daughter Alice, who recently moved out into a flat of her own. Alice is engaged to Sergeant Keedy, who is well liked by her parents (just as well!). When I was reading this book I got the impression that Marmion was almost like a father figure and mentor to Keedy. As the investigation is progressing, Marmion and Ellen receive shattering news: their missing son, Paul has been found locked up in a cell. Paul was a soldier fighting on the front line, and when he returned home, was plagued by flashbacks of the war and exhibited volatile behaviour. Nowadays we realise that he suffered from PTSD, but back then, people didn't understand this condition and Paul's family couldn't comprehend his actions. One day, Paul decided to break away from his The above is the main plot of 'Orders to Kill'. The book also features a subplot, where we get to know other characters in Marmion's life: his wife Ellen, and their headstrong daughter Alice, who is a WPC (women's police constable). Ellen accepted her husband's line of work years ago and is used to his long working hours. She is missing their daughter Alice, who recently moved out into a flat of her own. Alice is engaged to Sergeant Keedy, who is well liked by her parents (just as well!). When I was reading this book I got the impression that Marmion was almost like a father figure and mentor to Keedy. As the investigation is progressing, Marmion and Ellen receive shattering news: their missing son, Paul has been found locked up in a cell. Paul was a soldier fighting on the front line, and when he returned home, was plagued by flashbacks of the war and exhibited volatile behaviour. Nowadays we realise that he suffered from PTSD, but back then, people didn't understand this condition and Paul's family couldn't comprehend his actions. One day, Paul decided to break away from his family and walked away. His parents and sister haven't heard from him for a long time. Ellen and Alice decide to visit Paul, but what will they find? What will it mean for Marmion and his family? 
 This book gripped me from the first page, it's beautifully written and I loved all the characters and the setting. I plan to read other 'Home Front' series books in the future.
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A book set during the war period, there are bloody murders, a race across London and out, including  war torn  France, to find the truth behind murders. Finally leading to a surprising ending. As much as this book is a mystery, it is a story of as the world was in the 1917, the casualties, the beliefs and easy of  being who your not.
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Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher, Allison & Busby for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review “Orders to Kill.” All opinions are my own.

Inspector Harvey Marmion is called to the scene of a gruesome murder.  It’s December, 1917 in London.  Dr. George Tindall was a doctor at the Edmonton Military Hospital, which houses recuperating soldiers.  Before he was killed, the doctor was tortured.  That’s the start of “Orders to Kill,” the ninth book in the ongoing “Home Front Detective Series” by Edward Marston.  

Be prepared for the grumpy superintendent trope who’s always determined to cause trouble -- that figures big in this series, alongside the pithy dialog, all included in the Marston oeuvre.  But Mr. Marston does have a way with words, and knows how to plot a murder mystery.  And after eight books, one does tend to be invested in the Marmion family fortunes, that of wife Ellen, and the policewoman daughter who’s marrying Joe Keedy, his police sergeant.  And then there’s the missing son, who figures prominently in this book.  He’s got the equivalent of modern-day PTSD.  There’s a side-story involving his disappearance -- something that fills up some pages in the book, but also something that’s part and parcel of the Marmions and their lives.   His story isn’t resolved here.

There’s a lot of pounding the pavement in this book, something Marmion and Keedy do well.  Through it all readers will get glimpses of history and the Home Front, and how the battle in Europe is still affecting everyone (we’re eleven months out from the end).  And because the good doctor has lied about his background (the wheels of ferreting out clues grind slowly, but they turn), our inspector and his sergeant make a trip to France in the midst of war.  The pieces of an old and new puzzle are put together.  Is murder ever God’s Will, then?  You’ll need to read “Orders to Kill” to decide.
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Thanks to Random House/Cornerstone for allowing me an early copy of this book in return for an honest review.

I haven't read any of this series before, but that isn't a hinderance, as we're into the thick of things immediately, with the discovery of the brutal murder of a well respected, much loved and admired Doctor.

The two main protagonists, (Det. Insp. Marmion and D.S. Keedy) are on the case, and we go from there.

I enjoyed this book, but to me it's very much a light-snack of the genre, rather than a restaurant experience. This is, of course, not necessarily a bad thing, it just depends on your expectations.

All the characters are a little too 'nice' for me, although there is conflict, it's resolved sensibly, no grudges are held, and all is well by the next scene.

There's a pointless subplot around Marmion's daughter's workplace and an annoying colleague, and she has a  superior who changes character two thirds of the way through, and becomes 'nice' like everyone else..

Towards the end, there are leaps of deduction to bring things to a close. There are chunks of exposition towards the end again, with the baddies talking to each about how and why they came to do what they did. These are very jarring.

When the big-bad is caught, he gives in far too easily and the surrounding characters seem to just accept it, at least as far as we're shown.

So, not a bad novel as such, just feels like it needs chunks of plot removed and more thought put into the mystery and deductions of the Detectives, and more 'real' characters.
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December 1917. Ada Hobbes arrives on a frosty morning to clean the house owned by Dr Tindall, a surgeon at the Edmonton Military Hospital. She is shocked to find the blood-covered body of her employer sprawled across the floor. He has been hacked to death. Detective Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy arrive to a horrific scene. Someone enjoyed killing him, without a doubt. Their investigation takes them far out of London and on the trail of a very different Dr Tindall, one who was not the respectable local GP everyone thought he was. Marmion and Keedy will need to sift through a number of likely suspects to find the killer behind this gruesome murder. This was an interesting historical mystery based around events during WW1. I thoroughly enjoyed the characters, the believable dialog and the mystery itself. Apparently this is part of a series of Home Front mysteries so now I want to go back and read the rest. Thank you NetGalley for the advanced readers copy for review.
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Firstly, let me say a huge thank you to Allison & Busby and NetGalley for allowing me the chance to read this enjoyable book. I loved it that much I have gone out and bought another from the series.
The story starts with cleaner Ada Hobbes, who turns up for work only to find her employer Dr Tindall has been brutally murdered in a very gruesome manner. Enter Detective Inspector Harvey Marmion and Sergeant Joe Keedy, who are such a perfectly paired duo. In no time at all they start to break down the case unearth across clues that take them not only all over the country but across the sea to France as well. With pressure from their bosses and each layer unravelled leaving something new to find, they are under a lot of stress to try and crack this very complex case.
Along with the main story there are also lots of little sub stories from characters such as the cleaner Ada Hobbes and her sister and also DI Marmion’s daughter Alice who is a member of the Women’s Police Force and engaged to be married to Sgt Joe Keedy. Being set in 1917 England the war plays a huge part and touches on some of the realities that goes along with it such as Marmion’s troubled war veteran son who has gone missing since his discharge from the army.
The characters in here are all brilliantly developed, everyone with a story to tell, there are also lots of twists and turns throughout this book to keep you guessing. In whole it is such a delight to read, packed with suspense, drama and a few light hearted moments,
Even though this is book 9 in the “Home Front Detective” series you don’t need to have read any of the others to know what is going on. Such a great book, I highly recommend it.
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