Cover Image: Death on the Trans-Siberian Express

Death on the Trans-Siberian Express

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Member Reviews

From unpromising although authentic beginning (and well developed characters) it took a while for me to engage properly .. I kept waiting for story I was promised! (I guess title lead me to think Agatha Christie but that's wrong steer, really) .. but when it did start, it all took off! So give the novel a break .. loved Olga although I had difficulty understanding her position ..
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I'm afraid i really couldn't get into this book and gave up after a couple of chapters. I found it depressing and i have far too many books to read to continue with it. I'm sure there will be people who will love it but not for me .
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C J Farrington tries hard to offer the reader a chatty, idiosyncratic mystery novel set in a remote Russian village. This chatty plot device, as if thoughts tumble unbidden out onto the page, can be effective - although this reader was left somewhat unconvinced. Although it is not a particularly long book, the requirement to pick through the generous amount of extraneous detail made it seem longer. Despite these reservations there is an acceptable story tucked in the novel.
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Thank you to Netgalley for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

This is a well-written cosy mystery. Worth a read. Recommended
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Death on the Trans-Siberian Express by C J Farrington
 
I received an advance review copy for free thanks to NetGalley and Little, Brown Book Group UK and I am leaving this review voluntarily

Welcome to Roslazny - a sleepy Russian town where intrigue and murder combine to disturb the icy silence...

Olga Pushkin, Railway Engineer (Third Class) and would-be bestselling author, spends her days in a little rail-side hut with only Dmitri the hedgehog for company. While tourists and travellers clatter by on the Trans-Siberian Express, Olga dreams of studying literature at Tomsk State University - the Oxford of West Siberia - and escaping the sleepy, snow-clad village of Roslazny.

I read over 80% of this in one sitting, it was a relatively quick and easy book to finish. A lovely setting with great details about life in Siberia. A slow moving plot but overall an interesting read. 

Rating 4/5
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I started out enjoying this and was looking forward to seeing where it went but ended up getting a bit bored, the storyline dragged on a bit and I felt that I was just plodding on to finish it rather than actually caring about the outcome of the storyline.

Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for an advanced digital copy of this book.
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When a body falls out of a the Trans Siberian train and lands on top of Olga Pushkin, a railway engineer, her quiet life understandably changes. It is by far the most exciting thing that has happened in the remote village of Roslazny, albeit there have been a lot of unsolved murders in the surrounding region.  Olga gets involved in investigating this mysterious death when a new police sergeant, who attended the same school as her, is assigned to Roslazny to lead the search to clear up the case.
Olga whose life, up till this point, has centred round two things - her pet hedgehog and writing - turns out to be surprisingly helpful in solving the murder. Along the way she discovers a new confidence which leads her to gain the courage to radically change her life.
Charmingly told, this story really succeeds in conveying the generosity and human warmth Olga has unfailingly shown to this isolated and frozen community.  Her innocence and unconventional approach to solving problems is guaranteed to endear her to the reader and as a result Farrington's novel is thoroughly to be recommended.
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I wasnt too keen on this one. I felt like it wasnt what I was expecting and it really didnt deliver. Not one that I would recommend sorry.
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Books set in Russia always seem to be so long. This was worth getting into however. Our heroine dreams of a bigger life than an engineer working for the railway company, the other characters helped or hindered - mostly hindered, as the book progressed.
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Death on the Trans-Siberian Express by C J Farrington is set in Russia, with Olga Pushkn, Railway Engineer (Third Class), who wants more, in this case, to study literature at Tomsk State University, and become a best selling author.  But life is a little more boring than that, in a snow, boring village in Russia.

It becomes more exciting when Olga gets knocked over by an American tourist being pushed off a train, and so she becomes involved in the investigation, with the usual problems that a civilian helping the police has.

I enjoyed the story being set somewhere new, with a disappointed heroine trying to make her way in the world.  This felt quite like a cosy crime, and as this is labelled as book 1 in places, there are obviously plans for more in the series.

Death on the Trans-Siberian Express was published on 25th November 2021, and is available from Amazon, Waterstones and Bookshop.org.

You can follow C J Farrington on Twitter and his website.

I was given this book in exchange for an unbiased review, so my thanks to NetGalley and to  Little, Brown Book.
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A murder mystery set in deepest, snowiest Russia? The Trans-Siberian Express? A tough female protagonist?

This was a typical, slow to start book but one to stick with - a dead body is a part worth sticking for! The story is dramatic, a touch of a thriller but also contains humour and character development that makes you fall in love with the protagonist. 

This is a first for me by the author and one I enjoyed and would read more of their work. The book cover is eye-catching and appealing and would spark my interest if in a bookshop. Thank you very much to the author, publisher and Netgalley for this ARC.

3.5/5.
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Thankyou for giving me the chance to read in advance. A bit slow for me but a good murder mystery. If that’s your style then this is for you
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Olga Pushkin, Railway Engineer (Third Class) and would-be bestselling author, spends her days in a little rail-side hut with only Dmitri the hedgehog for company. While tourists and travellers clatter by on the Trans-Siberian Express, Olga dreams of studying literature at Tomsk State University - the Oxford of West Siberia - and escaping the sleepy, snow-clad village of Roslazny.  The characters in the book bring the story alive and leaves you wanting to hear more about them.
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An intriguing and quirky murder mystery, set in the small Russian town of Roslazny. Where the extremely likeable, but put-upon protagonist Olga Pushkin leads an uneventful life as a railway engineer with dreams of becoming an author and student of the Tomsk State University. Until the day she is knocked unconscious at work by a man falling from the Trans-Siberian, after which her life changes forever. She puts on her detective hat and slowly discovers an underworld of activity.

The characters are weird and wacky, and combined with plot revelations they do start to feel slightly stereotyped. However, the environment is evoked beautifully and didn't disappoint (the setting was the main reason for requesting this title). The conclusion of the murder is a bit rushed but I didn't mind as the going-ons of the small town were fascinating. It reminded me of the 90s TV series Northern Exposure and I would definitely read more in the series.
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This one started a bit slowly for me but when I did get into it I really enjoyed the setting of rural Siberia and especially liked the character of Olga (Railway Engineer Third Class), it all felt very authentic. It's an enjoyable murder mystery, the first in a series I believe and I'm looking forward to reading the next one when it's published. Thank you to Constable for sending me a digital copy of the book via NetGalley.
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The book is about a lady called Olga who is unhappy with her life being a railway engineer something she was pushed into by her father.  Life at home is very difficult as her dad is not easy to live with and drinks too much vodka and expects her to be at his beck and call.  She is saving as much money as she can as she wants to go to university to become a writer and puts down her thoughts through the day in the hope that she will be published.  Then something unexpected happens.  She is by her hut at the side of the railway with her hedgehog, Dmitri, when the Trans-Siberian Railway passes through her part of the line and a body is thrown out of a carriage knocking her down.  The body belongs to an American student, Nathan Bryce.  His throat is cut and his mouth has been filled with 10 rouble coins.  The police are called and an investigation takes place.  The Sergeant Manushkin arrives on the scene who is new to the area and has been seconded to the village for 6 months.  Olga has to give a statement as well as all the members of staff and passengers on the train.  Olga begins to listen to the talk and becomes interested in solving the mystery to bring a little cheer to her life.  The Lieutenant Colonel, Grigor Babikov, is in charge and decides she will get in the way and tries to manipulate the way the case goes – I wonder why.  He is quick to try and blame. Some of the characters come across as interesting. The story continues weaving this way and that and Olga then helps Manushkin who has been arrested for the murder which he did not commit.  As the book continues I found it very interesting as far as Russia was concerned and could see from the writing that it probably could be as corrupt as the book wants you to believe. Much research must have taken place for the story to flow so well.  The village is set around the local café and she listens and learns to follow leads which she does well  She follows every lead she can and eventually the story comes to a conclusion and Olga has enjoyed the experience of detective work.  Her brother comes into the story and they become as one against their father who is so difficult. And they both fly the nest together and Olga can then become the writer, hopefully, that she wants to become
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This unusual, highly readable ‘whodunit’ takes us to the remote village of Roslazny, or more precisely, to its tiny railway hut, where the novel’s protagonist, Third Class Railway engineer Olga Pushkin, ekes out a living whilst nourishing her dreams of going to university and becoming a writer. A capable, engaging woman, Olga is often taken advantage of by family and friends but really springs into action when a murder is committed. The reader then follows Olga’s amateurish but deft investigation in a remote community that harbours elements of corruption, chauvinism and alcoholism. In a departure from many traditional ‘whodunits’, Olga solves the murder fairly early on in the novel, so that the remainder of the book is dedicated entirely to the many subplots and shines a spotlight on some of the ancillary characters. A highly readable and unusual thriller warmly recommended. Let’s hope there will be more from Olga Pushkin! Thank you to the publishers and NetGalley for the free ARC I received in return for this unbiased book review.
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I'm an avid crime fiction reader so a new murder mystery was right up my street and this didn't disappoint!! I loved the super wintery setting and it left me guessing til pretty near the end of the book. Olga Pushkin is the perfect understated unexpected heroine and I'm so pleased that this looks likely to be a series. Highly recommend.
Thanks to CJ Farrington, Constable and Netgalley for the ARC.
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Maybe 3 ½ stars.  Took me awhile to get into this and I admit, I was ready to give up after only a few pages.  Not sure why it didn't grip me either.  Anyway, I am glad I persevered as the story developed into an interesting plot line.  Loved all the snow..  Not sure whether this is the beginning of a series or not, but would like to read more stories featuring Olga and Marushkin.  This could be the start of the Russian answer to Midsomer.  Thanks to Netgalley.
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This was an interesting read. I really enjoyed the characterization of Olga , the intricacies of her job and the wee hedgehog she cares for. I was also completely drawn in by the depiction of Siberia. While I’ve read a number of novels in similar settings none have the same gift as evoking the surroundings. Yet I found some of the plot and characters hard to follow through, and it was difficult to finish. Sorry I really wanted to love it.
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