Cover Image: A Warbler's Journey

A Warbler's Journey

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Member Reviews

A migratory yellow warbler's journey at the end of winter from central America to Canadian tundra as she comes across a Nicaraguan coffee farming family and their little girl who provide sustenance for her long journey across the Gulf of Mexico, an African-American family with a green thumb and their little boy who provide more sustenance for her journey, and lastly, a Łutsël K'é Dene First Nation family whose tribe, by securing the forest and the lake where the warbler resides, ensures she has a home. Thus, the author shows how nature cannot nurture us if we don't nurture it back. Every element and member of nature depend on one another, even a little warbler bird. Hence, it is our duty, as humans, to provide sustenance, home, and everything else nature needs to live.

Thank you, NetGalley and The Gryphon Press, for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.
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This is a great book for kids to introduce the concept of bird migration. The illustrations are just beautiful. Kids can cheer on the little warbler on its migration journey and the various stops along the way. This book is a good way to introduce kids to science and birds in general. The hardships experienced by wildlife and what they have to do to survive is something that kids can learn about so that they will be good advocates for wildlife when they grow up. I loved the way this book presented the story. It was interesting and the images also helped make the story really exciting. I loved it!
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I received an arc of this title from NetGalley for an honest review. I loved this book about the journey of a yellow warbler from Mexico to his home up north. I thought the illustrations were beautiful, and I liked how the warbler touched different families during its journey.
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Well written and beautifully illustrated with oil paintings by Nancy Lane, this picture book charts the miraculous, almost 4000-mile journey of a little female yellow warbler, from the tropical rain forests and traditional shade coffee farms of Nicaragua, to the Yucatan Peninsula, across the Gulf of Mexico, over the swamps of Florida, the farmlands of central North America, to her final destination on the shores of Great Slave Lake in Canada’s Northwest Territories. Scott Weidensaul describes the sights and sounds—the voices of other birds and of land animals—in the various habitats along the way. With the refrain, “These were just the sounds of the forest. The sounds of home,” the author emphasizes the naturalness of this journey for the migratory bird, her flexibility and adaptability to multiple habitats, and the fact that she has many homes, all of which sustain her on a remarkable flight.

At three points in the narrative, Weidensaul focuses on a young child’s sighting the bird, and learning a little about her. While the book ends with ways the reader can assist migratory birds and includes some useful hyperlinks, brief notes on the the warbler’s anatomy, lifecycle, and diet would have been welcome. Furthermore, attractive as Lane’s paintings are, their colours are occasionally too fluorescent. Several times the little warbler appears to be greenish yellow—too similar in colour to the background to remain distinct. It shouldn’t be hard to spot the main character in a picture book’s illustrations. The bird’s route ought to have been indicated in a bolder, contrasting pigment to to the colours of the map itself. These criticisms aside, this is worthwhile book.

Rating: 3.5 rounded up
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Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me the opportunity to read and review this novel. I am rating this book based the stars due to lack of time to leave a full review.
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This is a lovely book, but mostly what I liked were the illustrations. They seem appropriately delicate for a bird, but at the same time they are strong like the warbler must be to make the journey.
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This is a beautifully illustrated book following the migration of the yellow warbler. From it’s winter home in Nicaragua it flies north, crossing the Gulf of Mexico and North America to end up in the Northwest Territories of Canada. I appreciated the illustrations and depictions of different cultures as well as the stunning landscapes. A map is given at the very beginning , tracing the migratory path. The endnotes provide more information about the yellow warbler and thoughtful ideas for how we can assist in the protection of birds and their habitats.
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I wrote this review for my blog and Instagram: Miloureadsbooks
How gorgeous are these oil paintings painting? Such a fantastic non-fiction picture book! I always think it’s fascinating how animals travel the globe every year and know somehow exactly where to go, so this story about a tiny yellow warbler traveling from Nicaragua to Canada was just perfect for me.
This book starts in the middle of the jungle, with bats swooping, snakes slithering, monkeys howling and a yellow bird sleeping. That day a girl picks the final coffee beans on her day with off from school, together with her abuelito, abuelita, parents, brothers, and sisters. She sees how the bird eats insects before starting his journey. The warbler flies all the way to Mexico and then across the ocean, facing and surviving a big storm. She is happy to finally find a safe place in a garden from a boy and his grandma. For another few weeks, she flies through the countryside and over the lakes, to finally arrive in Canada. A indigenous girl just woke up, ready to celebrate that the land that had supported the People for generations would be a nature reserve from now on. The warbler does not understand any of that, yet she is happy to have returned to her place of birth and have found her partner.
I just loved seeing the beautiful illustrations with other animals in the background, like the hummingbird or the butterflies. It was also great to see how they weaved the different children into the story, with the utmost respect for their culture. Especially little things, like how the girl from Nicaragua helps her family AND normally goes to school or how they added the family traditions from the indigenous girl and their care for nature. This kids book also shows how to take care of migratory birds, by planting native plants in your garden and keeping your cat inside.
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Filled with beautiful illustrations, A Warbler's Journey tells the story of one little bird traveling thousands of miles in an informative story telling form.

Thank you NetGalley and Gryphon Press for the opportunity to read an advanced copy.
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A wonderful story about a bird's migration across the Americas and the diverse landscapes and peoples it sees along the way. Gorgeous pictures as well -- very soothing and awe-inspiring.
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This book is beautiful. The pictures are so vivid and colourful. My favourite has to be the one of the warbler flying through the night sky. The stars look magical. The journey itself is fascinating. To think that such a small creature can travel such huge distances regularly is amazing! It's also great seeing the way the author has woven the warblers journey in with human lives, all of whom clearly care about the nature world. I can't wait to use this with the children at my school.
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Ever wonder what it’s like for a tiny bird to fly all the way from Central America to Canada? 

The Warbler’s Journey, beautifully written by Scott Weidensaul and illustrated with gorgeous paintings by Nancy Lane, tells the story of a yellow warbler’s travels from her winter home in Nicaragua to her birthplace in the Canadian tundra. 

This well-structured tale will please young bird lovers and budding naturalists. Weidensaul’s choice of details to round out the story from the supporting characters she encounters to the food she eats will please those seeking to add diverse, inclusive and environmentally aware options to their bookshelves. 

Thank you to Net Galley and The Gryphon Press for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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*I received this book for free through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

If your child really likes birds/bird migration this would be great. The illustrations were detailed and unique. However, the text was lengthy and I don't think it would be very engaging for the average child. It tells you if you own a cat to keep it in or on a leash under control when outside (due to cats killing birds). Which defeats the purpose of the circle of life. Nothing spectacular about this book.
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Thanks to Netgalley and The Gryphon Press for a free digital copy.

Full of GORGEOUS illustrations, this book is educational not just about the migration of warblers, but of how humans and bird interact that can be beneficial to both. A lovely picture book.
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The warbler leaves Nicaragua, then makes a nonstop 600 mile flight across the Gulf of Mexico, winging over North America. After a nearly 4,000 mile journey, touching the hearts of many during her travels, she finally reaches her nesting site in the Northwest Territories.

Share her amazing flight in this thrilling and beautiful book.

The stunning illustrations by Nancy Lane are a gorgeous accompaniment to this wonderful story.
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Hugo, the. bunny fell  down a craviious and  he was not afraid However. Lars, the bunny reassured
Hugo, that he does not need to be afraid, although. Lars the, was silly and called Hugo was a scaredy-hare, which, was enouvh to make the pair aughmades this a  funny little story and most, importantly, with how the telling the story,endded up. Of course  making Hugo the braver of the two.. The two little kids, tell that story on its own, and for this reason. It was unnecessary to use dialogue to the tell actual story One thing about Han de Beer's picture book and  is he tells memorable story. I plan to read recommend and all any of Lans de Beers book which he alwayx  and tells an entertaining story and teaches all  thoughtful lesson taught to children
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This book is absolutely beautiful! It has a wonderful story and beautiful illustrations to hold a child's attention.
I will buy this book for my great-granddaughter.
I received a complimentary copy from The Gryphon Press via NetGalley and was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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birding, naturalist, nature-study, nature-preservation, migration, natural-history, paintings*****

Follow the migratory journey of one Yellow Warbler from Nicaragua at the beginning of winter to the US gulf coast at the beginning of spring to the Great Slave Lake in NWT, Canada, (a journey of 4,000 miles) in breathtaking oils and clear engaging text. The text does not compromise the paintings as it is presented in a sidebar. This book is listed as for children, probably because it is not a dry tome but a delightful learning experience for ALL and includes basic nature preservation info at the end. Read it WITH kidz or just by yourself, but DO NOT SQUIRREL IT AWAY! Get one for your school and local library while you're at it!
I requested and received a free temporary e-book copy from The Gryphon Press, Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA), Members' Titles via NetGalley.
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I really liked this book! The illustrations were beautiful and complemented the text. It was also very informative and would be great for kids that love to learn about ecosystems and are bird lovers!
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A gorgeous book, showing how a pretty little yellow warbler flies in its springtime migration from Nicaragua to the far north of the Americas.  It's a bit odd that apart from one bottleneck it's shown alone until practically the end, but the scenery and drama it flies past are wonderfully represented, and the artist shows her chops with conveying people as well, for what is also illustrated are three communities in the path of the bird's trek.  The end matter proves that if coffee plantations are turned into shade-less monocultures, and if people stop providing wild corners for wildlife, and if people demolish the ageless customs of these birds by ruining the land they live on, the trek could well be ending its days in all the wrong ways.  But this isn't a downer of a book, instead it's thoroughly positive, and very well-written, and an out-and-out charm.
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