Dandelion

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Pub Date 2 Jul 2024 | Archive Date Not set

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Description

Nomadland meets Mad Max in this anthology featuring stunning artwork by Martin Morazzo (ICE CREAM MAN), Vanesa Del Rey (REDLANDS), and more!

When climate change and automation disrupt the lives of millions, a new civilization is formed in the skies—one that threatens the wealthy citizens who’ve been hoarding Earth’s meager resources for themselves.

From Sabir Pirzada, writer of Marvel Studios’ Moon Knight and Ms. Marvel TV series, comes a bold vision of the future!

Early praise for Dandelion:

Dandelion is a big, insightful and wildly entertaining graphic novel. A prescient and poignant critique of where we may be headed, and the hope that remains in our most precious resource—humanity.” —Oscar Isaac, Moon Knight

Dandelion offers a revitalizing reflection of an imminent and profoundly tangible future world that demands its readers' attention. Elevated with art that good, it's impossible to look away. An utterly delectable read!” —Iman Vellani, Ms. Marvel: Mutant Menace

“Further proving Sabir Pirzada to be one of the most interesting new voices in comics, Dandelion is addictive to its very last page. It's the kind of humanist sci-fi the genre was built on—an undeniably relevant speculative fiction of a have/have-not society that examines a new technology's effect on its populace with almost compulsive comprehensiveness.” —Pornsak Pichetshote, The Good Asian, Infidel

“Weird, wild, and packed to the gills with incredible talent. Some real ‘up in the air’ thinking from Sabir and his cohorts here.” —W. Maxwell Prince, Ice Cream Man

Dandelion is a tremendously big sci-fi swing that confronts issues we're only beginning to face. A vital comic—highest possible recommendation.” —Gerry Duggan, X-Men

“Making comic book anthologies is tough. Making an anthology this consistent in quality is even tougher. Hat's off to Sabir and the plethora of incredible artists for putting something like this together. Dandelion's concept pulled me in immediately with its familiar but unique take on a dystopic, cyberpunk future. Once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. Each story was more engaging than the last. I gobbled it up in a single sitting. From action to romance to political thriller, this book jumps sub-genres with ease. I'm really hoping to dive back into this world soon.” —Michael Walsh, The Silver Coin
Nomadland meets Mad Max in this anthology featuring stunning artwork by Martin Morazzo (ICE CREAM MAN), Vanesa Del Rey (REDLANDS), and more!

When climate change and automation disrupt the lives of...

Advance Praise

Early praise for Dandelion:

Dandelion is a big, insightful and wildly entertaining graphic novel. A prescient and poignant critique of where we may be headed, and the hope that remains in our most precious resource—humanity.” —Oscar Isaac, Moon Knight

Dandelion offers a revitalizing reflection of an imminent and profoundly tangible future world that demands its readers' attention. Elevated with art that good, it's impossible to look away. An utterly delectable read!” —Iman Vellani, Ms. Marvel: Mutant Menace

“Further proving Sabir Pirzada to be one of the most interesting new voices in comics, Dandelion is addictive to its very last page. It's the kind of humanist sci-fi the genre was built on—an undeniably relevant speculative fiction of a have/have-not society that examines a new technology's effect on its populace with almost compulsive comprehensiveness.” —Pornsak Pichetshote, The Good Asian, Infidel

“Weird, wild, and packed to the gills with incredible talent. Some real ‘up in the air’ thinking from Sabir and his cohorts here.” —W. Maxwell Prince, Ice Cream Man

Dandelion is a tremendously big sci-fi swing that confronts issues we're only beginning to face. A vital comic—highest possible recommendation.” —Gerry Duggan, X-Men

“Making comic book anthologies is tough. Making an anthology this consistent in quality is even tougher. Hat's off to Sabir and the plethora of incredible artists for putting something like this together. Dandelion's concept pulled me in immediately with its familiar but unique take on a dystopic, cyberpunk future. Once I started reading, I couldn't put it down. Each story was more engaging than the last. I gobbled it up in a single sitting. From action to romance to political thriller, this book jumps sub-genres with ease. I'm really hoping to dive back into this world soon.” —Michael Walsh, The Silver Coin

Early praise for Dandelion:

Dandelion is a big, insightful and wildly entertaining graphic novel. A prescient and poignant critique of where we may be headed, and the hope that remains in our most...


Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781534397545
PRICE US$16.99 (USD)
PAGES 124

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Average rating from 107 members


Featured Reviews

Thank you Netgalley for the chance to read this in exchange for a honest review!

I kind of went into this with no expectations, and I'm glad I did that. This is a very unique graphic novel with a lot of heavy and important underlying themes. The different art styles used throughout were so beautiful and added even more uniqueness to the novel. Overall I enjoyed it and would definitely recommend it for fans of the genre.

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Thank you NetGalley for providing me with an ARC for this story.
SPOILERS TO FOLLOW

I have always loved a good dystopian story and this was not an exception. This was kind of a collection of stories all in one big story which is a concept I've always liked. It was especially really cool to see how some characters met up with other characters in separate stories. It made the larger world feel of the Dandelion's feel more connected to each other.

I think the beginning of the graphic novel gave me a bit of anxiety though, seeing how the Dandelion homes were established and how people were being forced into the sky because they had nowhere else to go was.... stressful. It wasn't what I expected (even though I should know better from a dystopian setting). A lot of the other stories were fairly lighthearted and sweet though. One of my favorite ones is the photographer who decided to give kids Christmas. It was a really good visual.

I also loved learning about Jen and her love/hate relationship with the Dandelion homes that she pushed for so hard. It made me think of the man who invented TNT and how he regretted what he'd done. In the story, Jen never expected that people would become imprisoned in their Dandelion homes, never landing on the ground again, and it really shows how inventions can be twisted to suit other peoples wants or needs.

The state fo the world as well felt very.... close to home. The discussions of global warming, of immigrants and "vagrants", being forced into prisons and dubbed "Exiles" just because they want to live was very charged.

I'm hoping there will be more issues of this and that this wont be how the story ends.

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A beautiful anthology depicting a dystopian world where the skies have been littered with airborne homes known as 'Dandelions'. This graphic novel follows several stories where we can see how the creation as well as the abuse of power surrounding the creation of these futuristic homes have impacted many individuals from all walks of life.

I genuinely loved this graphic novel! I went in blind to be honest and was pleasantly surprised. The stories are all woven together and every thing is pieced together wonderfully by the end of the novel. The characters were incredibly diverse and their stories were hugely impactful to the reader. I felt so many emotions throughout the reading of Dandelion.

This novel discussed the abuse of power by governments towards minorities, highlighting how wonderful creations can become twisted and controlled when left in the wrong hands. A young girl's dream became a way to exile people who were considered a stain to society in some stories, yet some people thrived in this new way of life. It highlights the diversity and differences within humanity. We experienced love stories, heartbreak, tragedies and violence throughout this short but impactful graphic novel.

The way this story is presented, through several short stories, many of which are linked together towards the end is wonderful! I felt like I was experiencing the creation, insight and impact of Dandelion homes through a documentary.

I understand why some people may not enjoy this work. At times it was confusing, especially trying to piece together the underlying storyline. However, it was a wonderful and insightful read. I'm looking forward to a reread already! The artwork was so beautiful and the stories were incredible! I'll definitely be recommending to my fellow graphic novel readers!

Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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Stunning, absolutely, terrifyling stunning. Speculative fiction that is inclusive and dystopic, but also reflects on issues that are becoming more and more prevalent in soceity

I cannot express enough how well put together this graphic novel is. Hugely talented graphioc artists come together to create something which I feel is a great work of literature in the same way "When the Wind Blows" was in the 80s for Raymond Briggs (he also wrote/ drew the Snowman, but I digress)

The story is interspersed with interviews with the creator of "Dandelions" floating ships, ecobubbles that save the rich from the environmental devastation on the ground. The poor and the middle classes are picked off, unalived if they do not comply with government control

The artwork throughout is mindblowing, let alone the narrative. The key positive message is the inclusivity and strength of the human spirit

Read this. Not just for the incredible artwork that flows from artist to artist, buoying up the narrative and adding to the experience of this novel, but for the reflection of soceities ills and the potental future ahead, not so far into the distance

Absolutely flipping glorious

Thank you to Netgalley, Image Comics, Sabir Pirzada and the various artists that have created this truly exceptional ARC. My review is left voluntarily and all opinions are my own

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Sometimes I struggle with Image comics, but this book hit mark. The stories all centre on a new invention—the Dandelion—that allows its inhabitants to live in the sky. Albeit groundbreaking, the Dandelion soon becomes another means to isolate people who are deemed “different”. They are called “exiles”, and in this collection, we learn what happens when isolation takes a very physical form. The comic can be violent at times, so I don’t think this book is for everybody, but if you like though-provoking comics that play with the medium, this may be the right read for you.

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A captivating graphic novel that immerses readers in a dystopian world of airborne homes. Through diverse and emotionally resonant stories, it skillfully explores the consequences of power dynamics involved in creating these futuristic dwellings. The characters' journeys, encompassing love, heartbreak, tragedy, and violence, add depth to the narrative.

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—Thank you so much to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for the chance to review an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.


I loved the art style of this so much. It was so different and interesting. Not for everyone but was great for me.
I’m also obssessed with the cover, it is stunning.

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This delightful and dark graphic novel paints a twisted tale of the invention and use of a technology called Dandelion- mobile homes for the sky. Through different art styles and snippets of different tales, the reader is left with a full picture of this speculative future. I recommended this one to any dystopic and graphic novel fans. Captivating.

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"You've never woken up from a dream that was so real you had to chase it?"

This comic was breathtakingly beautiful and highlighted so many hopes, doubts, and fears that are becoming apart of our current world'd everyday life. Sabir Pirzada captured the essence of desire for something that's never been done before with the bleak reality of what would come if we were to venture into such a vast future. Truth was provided... the question is, what's next?

P.S. - I'd love for these short stories within the comic to become a series!

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This stunning (I mean look at the cover) comic called on multiple artists to imagine a world in the not too distant future where we hide those we don’t want to see in floating pods called Dandelions. Was it meant to save the world or was it corrupted from the start?

I found the thread of the premise unique and would have loved to have been a fly in the wall seeing this collection take shape. I find that most collections have a miss or two for me and this was no different. However, I mostly found the artists’ styles captivating and the colors used breathtaking -- this is a work of art. There were a few stories where the art was by far more compelling than the story being told for me. My favorite entries, the ones that really made me feel something, are by Vanesa Del Rey and Eric Koda. I would highly recommend this for the artwork alone.

Thank you NetGalley and publisher for the ARC, these opinions are the product of my neurological system.

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See goodreads link for review
"To Build a Paradise
First you need a hell
Breath by breath, we all choke And the cows sound like laughter
We bake together until the crispy ice breaks
To build a hell, first you need a flood"
Genre:
-dystopian
-techno sci fi
-speculative
-horror
— eco horror
— techno horror
Dandelions the floating homes of our future. The sky is the limit so why not live life at its limits? A floating endlessly on autopilot across the globe, the Dandelion is the best way to experience earth through the eyes of a god and have your debt wiped free at same. Leave your country and come join us as global citizens of the sky!! Sign up for your floating home today!!

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That cover is pretty, but doesn't really sell the core concept here, the eponymous Dandelion being a mobile home in the skies, conceived by the mysterious Jen Nakamuto as part of the old human dream of being up among the clouds. But just as it took us less than a lifetime to turn powered flight from aspiration to arseache, so the Dandelions have been flipped from escapes to prisons, the world's copious unwanted given a subsidised life up there so long as they never darken the ground with their presence again. Even with lots more space than is considered necessary for the modern poor, never mind refugees, and even with VR and aerial hubs to ameliorate matters, it doesn't entirely make sense, but if there's one thing the 2020s has taught us, it's that dystopias don't have to - that's part of what makes them suck (and it definitely feels like the 2020s were an influence on the lockdown (even if it's up) of the airborne Exiles). Much like slow glass, or Niven's teleportation stories, this is SF of the one big change school, and like them it's told through showing us various characters navigating the changed world, rather than following a single protagonist (though some characters here do recur). And to emphasise that variety, different stories have different artists, Martin Morazzo and Vanesa del Rey probably the biggest names but all of them pretty good. I feel a little as if what we've got here is at an uncomfortable midpoint between scattered vignettes and giving us the full, Cities In Flight-style story of the rise and fall, but overall it's a strong introduction for a writer I've only previously encountered on minor superhero tie-ins.

(Netgalley ARC)

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This is an anthology of stories based around the concept of the Dandelion city in the sky, trying to deal with climate issues, not created for but used by the political rich to force the poor into the sky to leave the resources to them, I liked the comics style, the artwork style of the portrayal of the story of the Dandelion designer’s concept being abused. I found a mix of enjoyment in some of the other stories and puzzlement in others, which may play out and make more sense in future volumes. Overall I enjoyed the visual presentation of the comic. Thank you to Image Comics and NetGalley for the ARC. The views expressed are all mine, freely given.

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This is one of the coolest comics I've read in a long time. The format of an anthology was such a smart choice that really flattered the story in a way I didn't expect. It was really fascinating concept wise, too! I think I'd pick up a copy for myself.

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This story was fascinating. The melding together of artists and colorists to build this beautiful graphic novel was such an awesome thing to see. I loved the high concepts and how even though there was various art styles it all came together to form a singular cohesive story.

Every story within this graphic novel layered upon each other and added together to form something full of substance. Nothing was too much or out there everything felt like it worked together to make the story that much more rich.

The concept of having these floating cities where people could live and all their food and amenities were provided for them was fascinating. The touches of adding blueprints of what these pods were conceptualized to be by their creator and what the intentions behind the project were from the beginning. This story marries sci-fi and dystopia together beautifully to create something otherworldly yet wholly realistic.

This is a story I could read again and again to find more tidbits and things that add to the detail and think for myself what a world like that would be. My absolute favorite pieces of art in the whole graphic novel was a part that had no words at all. It told the story completely in its art work of a man’s murder, redemption, love, and partnership all the way to its end and it was absolutely breathtaking.

If you love dystopia as much as I do, Especially, if stories like The Giver (my all time favorite book) are stories that you rate very highly, you will absolutely adore this graphic novel. It’s such a cool mind meld that gives just enough of how the world is like to make you imagination take it even further and enough similarities to issues of our world to wonder what sort of horrors that we may be heading towards.

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I did not expect to love this anthology as much as I did, but I absolutely could not put it down.

‘Dandelion’ is a graphic novel anthology of interconnected stories set in a chillingly realistic near-future dystopia. In this world, citizens are forced to live in dandelion-like structures in the sky, whilst the rich stay rich on the ground, hoarding the remaining natural resources for themselves.

Each story seamlessly weaves into the overarching narrative, and the variety of art is genuinely breathtaking. There were so many moments where I simply had to stop and stare at the page.

While this is a quick and entertaining read, it serves as a vital reminder, much like many near-future dystopian tales, of the realities of where this planet is headed.

I look forward to diving into more graphic novels with diverse representation and important themes.

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"Dandelion" is an immensely satisfying and imaginative work of science fiction. The plot in this loosely connected series of vignettes floats and darts like a dandelion in a breeze as it explores the impact of a benevolently designed technology implemented without adequate safeguards. The technology itself is unlikely, if not downright fantastical, but that is far from the point since this book, at its core is, not so much a prediction of a dire future, as a candid and unflinching look at the dystopian present we live in now.


Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher, Image Comics for providing me with an eARC in exchange for my honest review.

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4 stars

Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for my e-arc of this graphic novel.

The art style changed with each issue - I like this becuase it gives a distinct difference to who's story we are following. This is less of one story, than an anthology of many stories happening in the same world. The art is beautiful and I loved seeing all the changes in each issue.

I particularly loved the opening panels of the issues. The openeing text is always the same, describing dandelions and giving a brief history (like an opening titles scene to a TV show), but the art beneath is different depending on the issue.

The overarching plot was lovely to piece together from the tidbits given throughout all the stories. Though, I understand that this won't be for everyone.

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In a world where the "unwanteds" live in the sky never to touch foot on the ground again. Pizada explores big concepts: Can VR replace human experiences? Should we trust AI to take care of our needs? Who makes the decisions? What do you do when your invention is used for harm?Each vignette give us reminders of what is important in life.

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What It's About: In a gettting-towards-dystopian future, a woman invents floating mobile homes called Dandelions. Once you pay for one you float through the sky forever, forbidden to set foot on the ground again. This book is an anthology about how this changes both people's lives and society in general.

How the Heck Is It? It's pretty awesome. All anthologies have their ups and downs, but there weren't any stories in here that I didn't like, and I loved several of them. Characters also re-appear, which creates a more cohesive world. The art styles on display are vastly different, but they work well together.

My favorite story in the anthology was The Pirate and the Fisherman. But, really, it was all good.

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I've never read anything like this before. I loved the graphics and it was intruiging to read, even if it wasn't what I was expecting

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The different art styles & separate yet interlinking stories make up a fully fleshed out dystopia that I couldn't help but want to explore more.
I devoured this in one sitting! Right from the 1st story, you are thrust into a dark world where people are exiled into dandelions. I am so glad we returned to the couple from that 1st story to see a happier side. I really enjoyed that each story had its own tone & did find myself enjoying the happier ones most.
I loved how the stories slowly show how the lovely hopeful invention was twisted for government gain. Along side the backgrounds of the exiles, the exploration of isolation & its effects is really made me think.

Thank you Netgalley for the chance to read this in exchange for a honest review!

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What a unique book with one of the most beautiful covers I have seen lately!
The cover art was what actually made me want to pick it up and read it.
The story did not disappoint, although the book’s art is not of the same level as the cover art. Each chapter has a different vibe in its art, each chapter has a different touch and tells the story differently. It’s not a bad thing per se, it was just something I was not entirely prepared for.
The story is well told and the art in general complements the story really well.

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Wow, I really loved this one. It had so much to say but the ways it says it are varied and beautiful. Through poetry, interview, chance meetings; I could read the stories of Dandelion for a very, very long time.

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Posted on good reads:

4.25/5⭐️
This dystopian world is brought to life through the stories of those directly impacted by this new invention and by an old interview of the creator of said invention.

Dandelion is an airborne home that was originally created to have another way of living, affordable, a way to travel while living, you know a whole positive view. That is until the governments uses this method to send up all of the riff raff , the poor, the disabled…all of those they deem unwelcome on ground.

The artwork is beautiful. Loved the cover and enjoyed reading the different POV and their tale of how Dandelions have impacted their life.

Thank you netgalley, image comics and creators for the opportunity to read this arc.

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I thoroughly enjoyed this dystopian graphic novel from Image Comics. I would highly recommend this if you enjoy comics like Paper Girls or Y: the Last Man.

Dandelion is a collection of stories about the invention of floating homes, created initially by a girl who dreamed of living in the clouds. In reality, these homes became prisons used to exile poor people to live out of sight from the rich and those in power. There is a lot of commentary throughout on automation displacing people from their jobs and how those in power distort good intentions for their own gain.

The stories are all interconnected and have various authors. I thought they did a great job of weaving characters and storylines together. The artwork is also gorgeous and there are different styles in each section.

I will definitely be picking up a physical copy when it comes out in June!

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What a clever and gorgeous anthology. The future depicted in Dandelion not only feels realistic, it feels possible and close. There was so much to love in this collection, and I wanted to sink my teeth into every single story and learn more about the people that live in this world. Beautifully done.

rep: Characters of color, characters with disabilities, wheelchair user, queer characters

spice: none

tw: trauma, racism, xenophobia, anti-immigrant sentiment

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As a collection of comics depicting a near future where exiles or otherwise unwanted citizens are sent away in flying structures called Dandelion, this album explores a gritty reality from multiple point of views, bringing in interesting reflections about AI, the over reliance on technology and the ecological implications of human impact on the planet.

I especially enjoyed Thomas Campi’s art in the chapter Oil and Water and the story of The Pirate and The Fisherman.

I’m grateful to have had a chance to read an advance copy from NetGalley.

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Dandelion has a really intriguing premise, but is much more focused on the effects of this premise on individuals, rather than the world-building. As someone who is a big fan of a character-led narrative, this wasn't an issue for me - even with the short vignettes only returning to a fraction of the characters featured. I did feel like there were a lot of loose ends - particularly in the more plot-focussed short glimpses, where we don't learn what happens next even after violence or terror, and we are often not shown a lot of the character's motivations. Certain ideas could have been explored more fully - for example, the impact of climate change on the world below only really becomes apparent towards the very end of the collection and throws into question some of the things the reader thought they knew about the world that the stories are set in. However, all in all, this was a fascinating read - although some of the vignettes weren't very effective for me, others were beautiful - and the premise of the Dandelions and the communities fostered by them will give me food for thought (I would happily read more set in this world).
3.5 rounded up to 4.

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I appreciate the quick pace of the novel as well as its topical subjects. The illustrations are very well done. I will be adding this to our library's collection.

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i have nothing bad to say about this book! it is 100% my favorite book i’ve ever had the pleasure of reading! i cannot wait to own a physical copy when it releases!

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This was such a fun idea, one graphic novel with multiple stories & illustrators centered around the same central story line! Brilliant! I loved how everything connected seamlessly, and read fluidly! All of the illustrations & storylines were so unique yet so connected at the same time! I loved the diverse cast of characters including some queer characters! I really enjoyed this book and I hope to see more in the future!

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“In 2041, Jen Nakamuto invented a floating pod—the equivalent of a trailer home that lives in the skies forever. She called it ‘Dandelion’. Vagrants, immigrants without asylum, and workers displaced by post-labor automation were sent to live out their days in these Dandelions. They were known as Exiles.”
So begins the science fiction comic anthology “Dandelion”.
I wasn’t super impressed with the art in this one (some stories were incredible, others were kind of so-so). I was, however, impressed with the way a single concept could be interpreted and woven together in the anthology. The stories take an interesting concept and bears it out to it’s most likely (and sometimes worst) conclusions.
This is the way sci-fi is supposed to work, and I love seeing it.

My thanks to NetGalley and Image Comics for giving me access to a digital copy of the book to review.

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I want to start by saying that I have never read a graphic novel before, and I'm not that heavily into science fiction so I didn't necessarily have any expectations of this book. That being said, Dandelion shocked me. Each section of the novel was drawn by a different artist and each one was just as equally impressive! But it was the story itself that really got my attention. With the world we live in right now it's not uncommon to see theories and stories about how climate change will effect our lives in the immediate and distant future, however, this was the first time I've seen an idea like the dandelion. Going between Jen Nakamuto's vision and the "real-life" application of her invention is brilliant to see. I didn't know who Sabir Pirzada was before reading this novel, but I definitely do now.
Thank you NetGalley for the opportunity to read this ARC!

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I really enjoyed Dandelion, both the premise and the execution delivered. The characters are interesting and I enjoyed the way that the stories were tied together. The art and changing art styles were also great.

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3.5 Stars - Dandelion is a compelling graphic novel comprised of stories and vignettes. The central concept is that Earth's exiles take to the sky, aboard individual sky homes called Dandelions, when Earth becomes unliveable for the average person. The stories are sometimes interconnected and threaded together by discussions of the now-missing founder of the Dandelion.

I've been looking forward to Dandelion for a long, long time. Speculative stories are my favorites, especially those that involve a ravaged near-future earth and a society that must deal with the consequences. While Dandelion had a unique premise, it didn't hold my interest as well as I'd hoped. I also didn't find the art in the graphic novel pages quite as breathtaking as the cover.

I do think Dandelion has an audience - and even an audience that will rate it five stars. For me, though, Dandelion wasn't fresh enough and didn't grip me right away.

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It took me a little while to get into this one, some of the characters stuck more than others. Getting to revisit characters/plot lines made it more immersive, and the world building is pretty cool. An interesting combination of sci fi and current concerns/issues in society. Certain stories are really heightened by the art with beautiful colors, details, and scope.

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A gorgeous collection of short comics exploring an dystopian future in which the skies have become the home of the exiled, with their inhabitants never again being allowed to set foot on the ground again.
Using different art styles and short tales we are exposed to a glimpse of the inhabitants of the skies lives, how they are treated, who are sold this home in the sky invention. Countries have used the invention of homes in. the skies to rid themselves of those they deem "undesirable" and created laws which mean they can never again touch the ground.

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I am so thankful to Image Comics, Sabir Pirzada, and Edelweiss for granting me advanced digital access to Dandelion before it hits shelves on July 2, 2024.

Dandelion takes place in the not-so-distant future, where the poor are labeled as Exiles and chartered off into the sky to live off their remaining days in "dandelions" or, more realistically, giant hot air balloons that float throughout the sky and are forbidden to land ever again. Throughout the course of this graphic novel, readers will find interconnected short stories that depict life in the sky, on the ground, and everywhere in between.

I really enjoyed this one and look forward to more graphic novels from this team.

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Review:

First, I'd like to send my thanks to NetGalley and Image Comics for giving me access to the eARC of Crave. What follows is my true and honest opinion.

Dandelion is a dystopian anthology where the sky is filled with airborne 'trailer' homes. The anthology follows a diverse cast of characters, who fall into a variety of minorities such as BIPOC, LGBTQ, Elderly, disabled etc. It also shows a clear depiction of classism, and how power corrupts. A strong theme throughout is that a good idea when in the wrong hands, could prove harmful or even catastrophic. The entire meaning of something can change based on who is in control.

I wasn't really sure what to expect when I started this, mostly choosing it based on enjoying previous things credited to the author. I did not expect to read such a hard-hitting and serious book. I enjoyed it, the artwork is stunning, and I like that throughout each chapter there are different art styles. I want to see this world developed further. Secrets have been half-revealed leaving me feeling like a rabbit with a carrot on a stick dangling in front of and quite frankly I feel that it is cruel to not have a sequel one day.

Dandelion is an exploration of a critique of the culture and danger of capitalist globalization and government policies that increasingly put profits over the people that they are supposed to serve, represent, and protect. Something which hits harder within modern-day problems. The abuse of power by the government and military, and the fact that homelessness increased due to the displacement of workers due to post-labor automation, a very real problem and fear as technology increases, and then the Dandelions represent a bandage. Something that is shown to fix the problem, but in reality is just a way to get rid of anyone who doesn't fit into the status quo. Free housing and never needing to work? Who wouldn't sign up to that? It's an offer that seems to good to be true. And that theme follows through the stories.

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Thank you to NetGalley and Image Comics for the opportunity to read the eARC of Dandelion for my honest opinions.

This dystopian work was fascinating to read, though a little close to home when thinking about it, which I suppose was the author's intention. The original idea of a dream to live amongst the clouds then turned into something dark and twisted; pods in the sky where people who don't fit in to the class mold are stuffed away to live out the rest of their days away from 'real life' is ... not so far removed. I think the scariest part of this whole novel is that this is all not so unthinkable.

The vignettes came together with an underlying woven tale of what happens when governments abuse their power and beautiful inventions turn into ways to control populations. I recommend this graphic novel to anyone who is a fan of this genre and enjoys a gripping tale that makes you think.

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All the different illustrations were gorgeously used in this graphic novel, and while a little convoluted, this was a great futuristic idea of what and how we might cope with the climate crisis in our current capitalistic environment. Depressing, but also hopeful for the future and resistance. 4.25/5

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This is the first proper graphic novel I have read through in a very long time. I wasn't sure what to expect but it was interesting! This dystopian themed book credits who has created the artwork and colour tones for each chapter which I really like, and each part was drawn out in really cool designs! I think my favourites were the artwork by Gege Schall & Thomas Campi.

The theme in the book is about the "Dandelion" pods that are homes in the sky, the stories showcase power imbalances and the various economical challenges for different parts of the world. The creators of the Dandelion pods are from Japan and their goal is to form globalised cities in ways that cannot be done on land. A very unique concept!

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I’ve found that everything I’ve received from Image Comics since restarting NetGalley this year has been great, and Dandelion is no exception.

A collection of stories set in a future where living pods that travel through the air have become the home of the homeless and unproductive, a place to be exiled and never allowed to return to earth.

In this world the pods are supplied and serviced by drones and the people in them are nationless and shunned.

One of my favourite episodes was titled ‘True North’ a story of hope tinged with great humour, but every story is worth reading.

Each story is nice and short, but though each episode is short they all pack a punch building up a world that we know could be ours in a near future, rather than using technological advances to better the world and lives of all, the rich use them to get richer and displace those deemed no necessary.

Each story is perfectly illustrated by several artists fitting the theme of the story perfectly.

I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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4 Stars

In a dystopian world, floating homes called "Dandelions" have been invented for an escape into the sky. Toted as the next big thing but those who live in them are typically vagrants referred to as "Exiles" and it turns into another way for the 1% to stay on top.

What I liked: I loved the illustrations, they are beautiful and I could get stuck on a page looking at the details. I loved seeing the variety of perspectives while following an interview with the inventor. I loved the ending, it was such a sweet finish. I really enjoyed the exploration of isolation

Favorite quote: "Sometimes you just need to look at history with a different perspective"

What I Didn't love: While I liked the different perspectives the transition from one story to another was a bit jarring and hard to follow and left me a bit disconnected from the story. Additionally, some of the information re: the Dandelions did not make much sense to me, such as why the government who was happily sending this people into the sky forever were also affording to feed them for free? Both these issues were likely due to the shorter length (120 pgs)

Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publishers for this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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I am always seeking new graphic novels to add to my collection that are not the same regurgitated story line with eye-catching illustrations that enhance the reading experience and "Dandelion" did just that. I loved that this book is an anthology of stories melded together and how the graphics enhanced the stories. Highly recommend for science-fiction and dystopian lovers who wanted to be transported in the world of exiles. Would purchase for a library collection.

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This graphic novel is a look at idea of a future earth where large amounts of people live in Dandelions or "motor homes in the sky". The novel tells the story of how the inventor had a dream of innovative and a step forward for humanity but how the rich and powerful of the world used it to make more money at the sacrifice and expense of marginalised communities or "exiles". This anthology told the stories of various people from criminals exiled to the sky and to families who chose to go up. I enjoyed how the stories had links together and how it all wrapped up neatly at the end. I loved the art style and feel it captured well the emotions of each story. I would definitely recommend to fans of science fiction and graphic novels. Thanks to NetGalley for this eARC.

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Essentially a short-story compilation in graphic format, all themed to the same idea: what if someone invented free-floating "homes" large enough that people could live out the rest of their lives there, never touching back down to earth again? And what if the government decided these should be used as housing for those people it wanted to essentially remove from society? (Similar to when convicts were given one-way ocean trips to Australia.)

The idea of the free-floating "dandelions" (houses) is a fascinating one, and unfortunately we don't actually learn much about them in this compilation. The stories focus more on the human reaction and experience around living (or not living) in the dandelions. A fair choice to make, looking at it from the human-experience perspective, but it left me with a lot of unanswered questions around the dandelions themselves that could have made for rich storytelling. Most of the stories are quite short (after all, they're one-shots, in the comic book sense of the word), which also means that we get a quick glimpse into the mind of a person or people related to the dandelion saga, but we never go too deep. The stories are split between one-shots about everyday dandelion inhabitants and one-shots that touch on the backstory of the mysterious inventor.

The art styles vary from story to story, as one would expect in a compilation, but they all play nicely together. All of the artists did a great job visualizing the dandelions themselves (although again, for a book titled "Dandelion" and ostensibly about these floating housing units, there is very little actual story or visual time spent showing/telling us about the dandelions).

I have mixed feelings about this book. The concept is fascinating. I feel it would have been more successful as a full-length graphic novel that took a few characters (perhaps one or two inhabitants, plus the inventor) and then spent the whole book digging into and expanding on those specific stories. Instead, this felt a little like a "what if?" collection akin to a "what if dinosaurs were vampires?" story collection where you get a lot of things roughly themed around the idea, but no central heart to hold it all together. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 for the originality of the overarching idea, and the opportunity always provided by this sort of compilation to showcase a variety of writers and artists.

Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this eARC for unbiased review. This review will be cross-posted to my social media accounts closer to the book release date.

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This was a story I went into not entirely sure what to expect and was pleasantly surprised by the amount of depth present across the threads woven throughout the novel. Dandelion explores a future where an inventor wanted to make living in floating homes that can travel the world a reality, but the governments of the world ran with the idea and turned them into floating prisons for those who were unfortunate enough to be too poor to afford living on the surface (among other reasons). You get to see the perspectives of a large variety of characters throughout the graphic novel, learning about how their lives have changed and what the invention of these Dandelions, these floating homes, mean to them.

Overall, this was a fun, if slightly depressing, read about how inventions made with the best of interests at heart can still be perverted by those in power to meet their own needs regardless of the inventor's hopes. I would recommend this book if you're looking for a quick read into a dystopian future that feels all too possible.

A big thank you to NetGalley for allowing me to read this in exchange for reviewing it!

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This was fun, the art was great and I enjoyed the flashbacks to the origin of the setting. I would read more in this series.

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Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me to read an advance copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review.
I ADORED the artwork in this graphic novel, it was truly breathtaking. As for the story itself...wow. It really speaks to the reality of our lives: the elite will find a way to monetize anything that is made to help the "outcasts" of society. I really enjoyed the interwoven storylines and all of the characters as well. This is definitely a read that will make you think, as well as one that will hit very close to home for some!

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This graphic novel explores a possible future where greedy people take an idea that was meant to help others and turn it into a way to gain more for themselves. It covers the stories of several people and families throughout a several year period who live on Dandelions (basically mobile homes in the sky).

The stories dealt with a lot of complex issues and situations that our world appears to be headed for, like the destruction of climate change.

The art was beautiful and the topic is both timely and important. My only complaint is that it was very disjointed. The book didn’t flow smoothly as it jumped from person to person and story to story.

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Thank you NetGalley for an opportunity to read an arc of DANDELION.

Fast-paced with incredible art, DANDELION is a masterpiece in the graphic novel industry. In a time of unrest, questioning how freedom can become a prison of its own making is profoundly disturbing but quite fascinating. The way in which technology is heading in today’s society already begs the question of what big surprising new advancement is next. And I think DANDELION really taps in to the future possibilities and fears surrounding such large scale tech that can be unpredictable. I would recommend this graphic novel one thousand times over.

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