Odin's Child

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Pub Date 23 Mar 2021 | Archive Date 25 Mar 2021

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Description

An epic fantasy trilogy from Norway about thousand-year-old secrets, forbidden romance, and what happens to those who make a deal with the devil comes at last to the United States

"Blood magic, blackmail, and battle rock a rich world of fading magic to its core in this internationally bestselling Norwegian epic fantasy." - Publishers Weekly reviews Odin's Child

I loved (Odin's Child) deeply from the first to the last word, and was instantly and thoroughly immersed. -- Laini Taylor, bestselling author of Daughter of Smoke and Bone.

...The story examines and upends everything its characters believe in, including their world, their history, their faith, and themselves, while intertwining elements of politics and Norse mythology with a side of forbidden romance. Kirkus Reviews

The intrigue, scope, and depth of His Dark Materials, set in an immersive Nordic world as fierce and unforgettable as its characters.  Rosaria Munda, author Fireborne/Flamefall - Aurelian Cycle

The world building is stupendous. MidWest Book Review


Imagine lacking something that everyone else has. Something that proves you belong to this world. Something so vital, that without it, you are nothing. A plague. A myth. A human.”

Fifteen winters old, Hirka learns that she is an Odin's child – a tailless rot from another world. Despised. Dreaded. And hunted. She no longer knows who she is, and someone wants to kill her to keep it a secret. But there are worse things than humans, and Hirka is not the only creature to have broken through the gates…

Odin’s Child is unique fantasy with Norse roots. An epic clash of xenophobia, blind faith and the right or will to lead.

The first in a trilogy, Odin's Child is a thrilling modern fantasy epic.
 
An epic fantasy trilogy from Norway about thousand-year-old secrets, forbidden romance, and what happens to those who make a deal with the devil comes at last to the United States

"Blood magic...

Advance Praise

"The story examines and upends everything its characters believe in, including their world, their history, their faith, and themselves, while intertwining elements of politics and Norse mythology with a side of forbidden romance. "-Kirkus Reviews

"The story examines and upends everything its characters believe in, including their world, their history, their faith, and themselves, while intertwining elements of politics and Norse mythology...


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ISBN 9781646900008
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Featured Reviews

I was very excited to get my hands on this once I saw the reviews for it in its original language. Let me tell you, this book does not disappoint. Hirka is likeable, from the way she hates the system was a raised in, to her emotional turmoil of finding out that everything you knew about yourself is a lie. I found the romance between Hirka and Rime interesting, and realistic. They’re strong characters on their own, which really builds for a fantastic relationship. There were moments that this book felt confusing, or slow and that took away some of my love for it. In the translation, there are still some terms that I wasn’t sure if they were apart of this new world, or apart of the Norwegian language. Additionally, I feel as though Urd’s part of the story was somewhat confusing. However, knowing this is a trilogy means that I may get those answers when the next books are translated. I found the plot of this and the world-building fascinating. It felt entirely new, despite it not being too new of a concept to the fantasy world. The way things were written and woven into one another was great, and Pettersen has really done an amazing thing introducing this into the world of epic fantasies. I am incredibly excited for the next two books to be translated into English and get my hands on them.

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“They call her the tailless girl. Wolfgirl. I’ve heard Ravengirl, too.” Odin's Child came out originally in Norway by a Norwegian author in 2013, but is finally releasing in English March 23, 2021! It is the first in a trilogy named The Raven Rings, and it is a fantastic beginning to what promises to be an epic fantasy based on Norse Mythology. I devour mythology of all kinds, and Norse mythology is no exception. Odin's Child is a reimagining of the Norse mythology realms and what it means to be different. It is the kind of story that keeps you on the edge of your seat, biting your lip as you lean into the moment with the characters. It sucks you in and before you know it, you very nearly forget you're not part of it. This is the kind of sweeping fantasy that fills the mind with color and emotion and action, and I am absolutely invested in it for the next two book translations. In a realm known as Ym, Hrika is a fifteen year old girl on the precipice of womanhood. In a few months, she has only to pass the coming of age ritual known as the Rite, to demonstrate her ability with the Might. But as that day appears, her father reveals a secret that shatters her very understanding of herself and the world she lives in. Hrika isn't just a girl whose tail was lost in a childhood accident. She is Hrika the Tailless, an Odin's Child, a creature of myth and horror. Despised and feared, the closer the Rite approaches, the deeper the danger to her life. Especially when her best friend (and sometimes opponent) is the heir to a seat on the Council and one of the most powerful in the Might they've seen in generations. After all, a tailless girl is an acceptable friend for a boy, but not the kind of company an heir keeps. An heir with his own secrets to a council whose secrets are deepest of all. Hrika is a wholly believable and likeable main character whose thoughts and actions don’t follow today’s YA protagonist angst. I very much think I would have befriended her had I been a Ymling. The raven lore is fascinating for it is symbiotic and sacred in Odin’s Child, especially when you consider how frequently the raven plays in many mythologies, not just Norse. It also calls into question how exactly Odin got his two ravens which is a question I would very much enjoy seeing answered in the coming books. Rime is another character that you can’t help but root for, even if his motivations and actions are far murkier. “Imagine lacking something that everyone else has. Something that proves you belong to this world. Something so vital, that without it, you are nothing. A plague. A myth. A human.” Just how far will Hrika go to survive and how will it change not only her, but also the only world she has ever known? I will caution that while it is labeled Young Adult fantasy, I would probably place this more on the new adult/ adult side of things. The protagonist, Hrika, and Rime are young, but the author does not hold back on descriptions of gore and death. There is violence, xenophobia, blind religion, and sexual aggression as well.

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This book was everything I ever needed, but didn't realise it could be. Myth, legend, reality, heartaches of all kinds, it has everything. Such a richly-composed world, reminiscent of the kingdoms and relationships with Lord of the rings, the tale weaves a tapestry between kingdoms, types of being, reality and magic. It also doesn't shy away from the light and dark within a person, really showing the reader how both are necessary, but that morality must win everytime. There's a sweet undercurrent of love that grows throughout the story, that grounds the reader in emotion that they can relate to. All in all, a wonderful tale about being different, and really knowing who you are as a person.

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Odin's Child is a delightful start to a fantasy trilogy. Hirka was a compelling character, and I enjoyed the slow build and the gradual, well-planned world building, which let the reader to discover new information as needed without info dumping. The translated prose flowed nicely and allowed me to make swift progress, finishing just over 600 pages in about six hours of reading time. The plot was gripping and I turned the last page of this first book eager to find out what would happen next, so I hope there will not be a long wait for Book Two. I found the romance between Hirka and Rime a little forced at times, but I am willing to wait and see how it further develops in the later books. And for once it was nice to see the antagonist presented with enough depth that we get some inkling of what he is thinking and why, rather than just moustache-twirling evil. All up, a solid and enjoyable read for fans of fantasy with a folklore bent, and I would certainly be keen to read on in the series.

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