Architecture York

Twentieth Century Plus

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Pub Date 28 Jan 2022 | Archive Date 10 Feb 2022

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Description

You live in York UK, you’re thinking of paying a visit, or you just like buildings? Then this new work from John Brooke Fieldhouse is a must have!

It’s a guide book. But it’s completely different, it’s not what you’d expect from the city of Vikings, Romans, the medieval, the Civil War, the Georgians, and the Victorians. It’s about the twentieth century and later – right up to 2018. Its buildings – public and private - how they’re designed, engineered, lit, heated, ventilated...and not just buildings, there are 130 plus items, including bridges, a flood barrier, details like windows, seating, handrails, landscaping, paving, all the things we touch when we move through a city, the things that make us feel good or bad.

It’s 260 pages, 360 colour photographs, fifteen pages of indexes and an introduction, consisting of unsentimental and unvarnished answers by the author to over 30 questions on the book and York. Answering questions and always asking more. It’s not just the past, it’s all about the present and the future. We spend most of our lives in buildings, they are art, science, psychology and politics so it’s essential we all have our own view about them.

You live in York UK, you’re thinking of paying a visit, or you just like buildings? Then this new work from John Brooke Fieldhouse is a must have!

It’s a guide book. But it’s completely different...


A Note From the Publisher

John Brooke Fieldhouse graduated from the Royal College of Art with a Masters in architecture. Established London & Yorkshire-based design practice BFA in 1990. He has lived for the last 11 years in York where he has led walks on 20th Century York for and on behalf of the York Civic Trust.

John Brooke Fieldhouse graduated from the Royal College of Art with a Masters in architecture. Established London & Yorkshire-based design practice BFA in 1990. He has lived for the last 11 years in...


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Currently available for pre-order through Apple, released 28th January 2022.

Currently available for pre-order through Apple, released 28th January 2022.


Available Editions

EDITION Ebook
ISBN 9781803138398
PRICE £6.99 (GBP)

Available on NetGalley

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Average rating from 7 members


Featured Reviews

Fascinating book
Takes you around stunning York one most beautiful places to visit
Loved every moment

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I've visited York several times over the years and absolutely love it! It's beautiful and packed full of history. _Architecture York_ helped me realize the city's (town's? LOL) significance from a 20th-century architectural perspective, as well; now I feel like I need to go back and capitalize on what I learned with the read!

The introduction is more entertaining than I'd expected it to be, with a more Q&A-based approach than simply the author presenting his own thoughts. I expect he and I have a similar sense of humor (maybe it's the part Brit in me), as I found myself chuckling several times at the questions included. It did drag on a bit for me after a while, but I was just ready to get to "the good stuff" more than anything else. And, that "good stuff" absolutely met my expectations.

The "brick" section was my favorite, as I'm a big fan of more classic/classical architecture. But, each of the other sections certainly offered up unique styles and insights, and I found something to enjoy in each. There's truly something for everyone, both in style and era--and history buffs (especially of either of the world wars) will find components of the read particularly interesting.

Niched? Yes. But regardless, a great and unique way to learn about recent history through architecture.

3.5 stars, rounded up to 4.

I received an eARC of the book from the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

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Given that it's nearly always discussed in context of its history, a study of 20th century architecture in York is a unique and interesting choice. There's such a wide range of things featured here, from public buildings to World War One practice trenches, to someone's Christmas decorations, and it makes for a fascinating alternate look at the city. The book starts with a long, irreverent, conversational introduction (yes, I read it) outlining its intent, then proceeds, directory-style, through places of interest, loosely organized by material (concrete, stone, etc.). Each article consists of dates and structural information, along with editorial comments about the character and relative success of the architect's vision. Three pictures are also included so readers can get an overall view and glimpses of detail.

This would be good pre-reading and a helpful field guide for any architecture buffs planning a trip to York. It certainly inspires readers to see the city in a new way!

Many thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review!

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I have had the opportunity to visit York twice, once as a tourist and once as a student and both times my focus was on the ye olde history of the city. Rather than focus on the old, which is the logical thing to do when the subject is York, John Brooke Fieldhouse takes readers through the modern additions to York. I really liked this concept of focusing on what most people would pass over as the mundane. The book includes an introductions explaining John’s reasoning behind creating the book and descriptions and photographs of modern pieces of architecture found throughout York. The photos were all taken by the author. The information given about each location is brief, but as the author explains, a lot of times there isn’t information available on who built a wooden addition or installed a handrail. I would be interested to see the locations mapped out to get an idea of how many were in the outskirts and how many were in York proper. One of the most fascinating things to me was the scars on the ground from the practice trenches dug by the British Army in WWI. When I was digging through my photos for my bookstagram post I was pleased to find that one of the buildings included in the book was in the side of one of my photos, because I really had focused on the very old on my travels. This book has inspired me to appreciate the modern aspects as well as the old when I visit cities.

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I enjoyed looking at this alternative guide to York architecture, many parts of which I would have usually passed by without a second glance. There is a good introduction which discusses the various things that have affected the development of the city, including the transport system. There are many photos which have succinct details about their history, architect, engineers etc. Some of this history is very interesting; I was unaware of the scale of bombing in York in WWII. Although the postcodes are given with each building, I would have been interested to see their locations on a map. Without the map they feel a bit random and lacking any cohesion. That said, I did enjoy the book. Thank you to John Brooke Fieldhouse, Net Galley and Matador for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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Really cool book for architecture lovers if you want to discover York. I was pleasantly surprised by the large amount of buildings referenced and the extensive materials used and styles adopted within that city. I would definitely categorize this as a coffee table book.

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