NOT A LOT OF REASONS TO SING, BUT ENOUGH

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Pub Date 1 Mar 2022 | Archive Date 18 Apr 2022
Button Poetry, Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA), Members' Titles

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Description

Kyle Tran Myhre’s NOT A LOT OF REASONS TO SING, BUT ENOUGH is a sci-fi-flavored exploration of the role that art and artists play in resisting authoritarianism.

Featuring new poems, theater elements, and Casper Pham‘s stunning visual art, the book follows two wandering poets as they make their way from village to village, across a prison colony moon full of exiled rebels, robots, and storytellers.

Part post-apocalyptic road journal, part alternate universe ode to Hip Hop, and part “Letters to a Young Poet”-style toolkit for emerging poets and aspiring movement-builders, it’s also a one-of-a-kind practitioners’ take on poetry, power, and possibility.

Kyle Tran Myhre’s NOT A LOT OF REASONS TO SING, BUT ENOUGH is a sci-fi-flavored exploration of the role that art and artists play in resisting authoritarianism.

Featuring new poems, theater elements...


A Note From the Publisher

eBook (9781638340102)

eBook (9781638340102)


Advance Praise

“This collection is a clear, fantastical, urgent excavation of the self and the crumbling pillars of the structures that surround us. Wondrous language underscores an unforgettable voyage across creative formats, circling the phenomenons that artists are and can be capable of.”
— Blythe Baird, author of If My Body Could Speak

“Guante rattles, resists, and reimagines the reach and convention of the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves. How we continue to write our hopes, our fears, and our image into every world we build—at times giving new names to oppressive systems we meant to free ourselves from. Not A Lot of Reasons to Sing, but Enough reminds us, especially the artist, that there is no meaningful world-ending without world-building. That our freedom from cycles of violence may exist in the principles of the cypher, the surprise of the arcane, or in the ancient technologies of the classroom, but always at the mouth of our collective brilliance.”
— Joseph Capehart, poet & educator

“I have never read a book more slowly because every word seems to demand its own moment. Tran Myhre gives us a chance to excavate a lovingly realized bygone world of heroes, thinkers, and poets struggling with the nature of art, justice, and humanity. Pham’s images gorgeously fill in the emotional spaces outlined by the words. In these pages you will find artists and rebels and troublemakers, and they will break your heart wide open.”
— Trung Le Nguyen, artist and author of The Magic Fish

“This collection is a clear, fantastical, urgent excavation of the self and the crumbling pillars of the structures that surround us. Wondrous language underscores an unforgettable voyage across...


Available Editions

EDITION Paperback
ISBN 9781638340096
PRICE US$18.00 (USD)

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Featured Reviews

I don't know what I was expecting when I threw my name in the metaphorical hat to review Not a Lot of Reasons to Sing. I haven't often thrown myself into the poetry world since leaving the classroom but something about the mix of sci-fi and poetry had my attention. And I was not disappointed.

If you look for your poetry to have the face slap, scream the truth from a stage bite of slam poetry, this has it.
If you look for your poetry to teach you something about the life best lived, this has it.
If you prefer poetry that forces you into yourself to seek the tiny kernels of truth, identity, and power.... this has it.

Myhre has taken us out of this world into a future that is both like and unlike the society we live in to force us to face all of the ugly injustices we do to ourselves, our neighbors, and to our futures both in the light of day and in the dark recesses of our private thoughts. That bitterness is chased by the ever-present undercurrent of hope and possibility. Myhre is both challenging us to face what we are and what we can become.

Were I still teaching, this would make an instant addition to my curriculum for creative writing and multicultural lit.

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